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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: February ::
Duke Vincentio; Psycho Macbeth
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0129.  Friday, 18 February 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Terry Craig <
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        Date:   Thursday, 17 Feb 1994 10:15:52 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   The Duke in MM
 
(2)     From:   James McKenna <MCKENNJI@UCBEH>
        Date:   Thursday, 17 Feb 1994 10:28:34 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   macpsychbeth
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terry Craig <
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Date:           Thursday, 17 Feb 1994 10:15:52 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        The Duke in MM
 
Daniel Massey has written an essay about playing the Duke. It's in *Players of
Shakespeare 2* published by Cambridge UP.
 
Cheers to all and thanks to Luc--
 
Terry Craig
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James McKenna <MCKENNJI@UCBEH>
Date:           Thursday, 17 Feb 1994 10:28:34 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        macpsychbeth
 
The psycho Macbeth does diminish consideration of the horrors of the world.  It
also puts a wall between us and Macbeth.  I think this is unnecessary.  (I want
to note, however, that RICHARD III does overtly what we're supposing MACBETH
to do.  Macbeth is, like Richard of Gloucester, a career soldier
with little to do in "this piping time of peace."  However, unlike
Richard, whose conscience seems atrophied almost nothing, Macbeth has a very
active conscience.)  It seems consistent with the text to view Macbeth and
Banquo in similar light--both voice the existence of unacted horrors within
them.  Yet Macbeth is cursed with someone who encourages him to bring those
horrors into the world.  How different is that from each of us?  And how nearly
might that describe the birth of much of the world's horror.  See also
Marlowe's analysis of Kurtz in HEART OF DARKNESS.
 
James McKenna
mckennji@ucbeh.bitnet
 

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