Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: February ::
Rs: *Ado* Availability; Ophelia and Gertrude
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0157. Saturday, 26 February 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Jorge Diez <Jorge=Diez%lab%
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 25 Feb 94 17:05:56 PST
        Subj:   re: SHK 5.0154  Re: *Ado* Video Availability
 
(2)     From:   Steve Urkowitz <SURCC@CUNYVM>
        Date:   Saturday, 26 Feb 94 08:29:26 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.01445  Q: Ophelia and Gertrude
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jorge Diez <Jorge=Diez%lab%
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 25 Feb 94 17:05:56 PST
Subject: 5.0154  Re: *Ado* Video Availability
Comment:        re: SHK 5.0154  Re: *Ado* Video Availability
 
WRT the "Much Ado" release for home video, note that it will also be out in
the laser disc format for 34.95. Ah, but here's the rub...they say there is
no mention of widescreen or letterbox. Here's hoping they're wrong...
 
J.L.Diez
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steve Urkowitz <SURCC@CUNYVM>
Date:           Saturday, 26 Feb 94 08:29:26 EST
Subject: 5.01445  Q: Ophelia and Gertrude
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.01445  Q: Ophelia and Gertrude
 
For a VERY early comment on the possibilities of Ophelia and her nearly momma
in law, I'd suggest a quick look at the 1603 First Quarto text of HAMLET.
Whoever was responsible for the text (a piratical actor? Shakespeare herself?
Nostradamus? Franco Zefferelli?) we have a deliciously different configuration
of forces, actions, and language circulating around these two women.  I have a
few broad outlines of the alternatives in Gertrude's role in "Five Women
Eleven Ways: Changing Images of Shakespearean Characters in the Earliest
Texts" in W. Habic ht, et al., IMAGES OF SHAKESPEARE (1988).
 
                                           Good hunting,
                                             Herne the Urquartowitz
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.