1994

Anagrams

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 11.0093  Monday, 17 January 2000.

[1]     From:   Stefan Kirby <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 16 Jan 1994 00:32:21 -0800
        Subj:   Off-topic, but remarkable!

[2]     From:   Aaron Keith <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 15 Jan 2000 05:10:33 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 10.2294 Re: Honorific...


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stefan Kirby <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 16 Jan 1994 00:32:21 -0800
Subject:        Off-topic, but remarkable!

Here's an interesting anagram I found, made from not just a word, but an
entire sentence:

"To be or not to be: that is the question,
whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune."

(anagram)

"In one of the Bard's best-thought-of tragedies, our insistent hero,
Hamlet, queries on two fronts about how life turns rotten." (Cory
Calhoun)

Those interested in anagrams may look to this website:
http://www.wordsmith.org/anagram/hof.html

        ~Stefan Kirby

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Aaron Keith <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 15 Jan 2000 05:10:33 EST
Subject: 10.2294 Re: Honorific...
Comment:        Re: SHK 10.2294 Re: Honorific...

>Absolutely.  I invite you to download any number of shareware anagram
>programs on the internet and amuse yourself and your friends mightily by
>inputting your names and seeing what you get.  My own full name yields
>"Mentally derails," which I don't think is preferable to "Mentally lead,
>sir," although my theatre company has opted for the first.

Where can one find these anagram programs?

Aaron Keith

Qs: Suggested Order for Reading; Bianca Bait

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0081.  Monday, 31 January 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Blair Kelly III <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 30 Jan 1994 18:30:57 -0500
        Subj:   Suggested order in which to read plays?
 
(2)     From:   Ronald Dwelle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 31 Jan 94 09:43:32 EST
        Subj:   Bianca Bait
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Blair Kelly III <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 30 Jan 1994 18:30:57 -0500
Subject:        Suggested order in which to read plays?
 
Later this year the Washington Shakespeare Reading Group will finish
its second cycle of reading the works of William Shakespeare.  I would
like to solicit suggestions from SHAKSPEReans on possible orders in
which we might read our third cycle.  Our first cycle was random order,
our second cycle was in rough order in which the plays were written.
Obviously, in the interests of variety, we would like to mix the
histories, comedies, and tragedies, but other than that restriction,
anything goes!  Besides suggested orders for the entire canon, possible
orders for subsets are also welcome - for example, read the history
plays in order of the historical time line (although in the interests
of variety, I would have to schedule some comedies and tragedies
among the histories).
 
And for any SHAKSPEReans who will be in the Washingon DC area, you are
cordially invited to join us for a reading.  Here is our upcoming
schedule:
 
Friday     4 Feb   Measure for Measure
Saturday  26 Feb   Othello
Friday    11 Mar   All's Well that End's Well
Friday    25 Mar   Timon of Athens
Friday     8 Apr   Macbeth
 
We meet in Memorial Hall of the Palisades Community Church, 5200
Cathedral Avenue NW, Washington DC, and begin promptly at 7:30 pm.
---
Blair Kelly III         This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Secretary, Washington Shakespeare Reading Group
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ronald Dwelle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 31 Jan 94 09:43:32 EST
Subject:        Bianca Bait
 
I'm seeking historical/cultural info. How are we to regard Baptista's offering
of Kate & Bianca, particularly the requirement that Kate be married off before
the suitors can get at Bianca?
 
In Shakespeare's day, would this have been thought of only as a ludicrous,
farcical proposition? Or is this more an exaggeration of rights and duties that
Baptista would have had? If so, are these "legal" rights and duties, or moral
compunctions for a father in his position? Is Baptista a pure Elizabethan or
would the audience have thought him Italian/continental for making this
proposition? Does the absence of a mother affect the situation?
 
Related, how are we to take the dowery difference--Petruchio takes in but
Lucentio/Hortension/Gremio have to put out? (same questions as paragraph 2).
 
(If this has all been clearly addressed in print and I've simply overlooked it,
please point me the way.)
 
Thanks in advance.

Re: The Human Condition

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0079.  Monday, 31 January 1994.
 
From:           William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
Date:           Sunday, 30 Jan 1994 16:52:34 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0074  Re: *MND*, *Lear*, and the Human Condition
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0074  Re: *MND*, *Lear*, and the Human Condition
 
Richard Jordan and Sean Lawrence seem to be right on target. Of course, there
are universal human experiences. Let's try hunger for one; the experience of a
beating heart for another. Terence, do you know any humans who don't get hungry
when deprived of food, or who do not have a heart (no metaphors, please)?
 
Shakespeare's kings are constantly alluding to the different between their
social identities as KING and their private selves, e.g., Richard II and Henry
V. It's part of the tension in the histories plays.
 
The only way we understand each other in a culture and across cultures is by
shared experiences. In fact, that's how we understand the needs of other
mammals, e.g., cats and dogs.
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk

Re: Gender Switching in Stage Productions

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0080.  Monday, 31 January 1994.
 
(1)     From:   James McKenna <MCKENNJI@UCBEH>
        Date:   Sunday, 30 Jan 1994 22:04:44 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Gender Switching
 
(2)     From:   Norman J. Myers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 31 Jan 94 10:19:34 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0073  Q: Stage Productions
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James McKenna <MCKENNJI@UCBEH>
Date:           Sunday, 30 Jan 1994 22:04:44 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Gender Switching
 
Dear Chris Daigle,
 
ADO's Don John the bastard is a good candidate.  His use of Hero becomes even
uglier--and just what is the relationship between Don Joanne and her minions,
Borachio and Conrad?
 
In CE, either the father of the Antipholi or the Duke of Ephesus would probably
work.  The rest of the characters seem a lot of effort or not significant
enough in reversal.
 
Thanks for some fun speculation!
 
James McKenna
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Norman J. Myers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 31 Jan 94 10:19:34 -0500
Subject: 5.0073  Q: Stage Productions
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0073  Q: Stage Productions
 
I directed a "Shoestring Shakespeare" production of COE last year.
Shoestring Shakespeare means that we do the plays in a small room and strip
the production of most of the "necessary" trimmings so as to focus on the
text.  I was faced with the typical problem of more women auditioning than
men.  After casting the sets of twins, Adriana, Luciana, Abbess.,
Egeon, Duke, Courtesan, I found I had several women and only one man left
of those deemed sufficiently adept.  So I had these people play "everybody
else".  Women played Angelo, the first and second merchant (same actress),
Guard and Luce and Headsman (same actress) and Dr. Pinch's attendants
(Angelo and Second Merchant).  It seemed to work well, and nobody assumed
any particular comment was being made by having women play those male
roles.  Of course it all depends on what you want to do.  I suppose in MND,
for instance, you could make quite a comment by having Bottom played by a
woman.
 
Norman Myers
Bowling Green State University

Re: Romantics Lists

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0078.  Monday, 31 January 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Mary-Katie Lindsey <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 30 Jan 1994 14:41:43 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Romantics list
 
(2)     From:   Daniel Traister <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 30 Jan 1994 19:42:58 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0076  Q: Romantic Lists
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mary-Katie Lindsey <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 30 Jan 1994 14:41:43 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        Romantics list
 
There is indeed one -- NASSR -- North American Society for the Study of
Romanticism.  It is on English Romanticism.  I do not know about French lit of
the c19 or on Baudelaire.
 
The address is:
 
    NASSR-L  For members of the North American Society for the Study
    of  ROmanticism.  Scholarly discussions of Romantic literature.
 
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    listserv@wvnvm                      -- BITnet address
 
If those don't work, send to
 
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (David C. Stewart)
 
Since the description doesn't specifically say that it is only about English
Romanticism, I could be mistaken.  Certainly it seems as if all Romantic
literature could be discussed.  (I hope so.)
 
If you are interested in more addresses, I recommend Eric Braun's _Internet
Directory_; it seems to me to be the most complete bibliographic sourse on Net
discussion lists.  I got mine at Waldenbooks for about $25 (whew!).
 
If you would like for me to look up any other addresses, please ask; I am glad
to do so for anyone.
 
    Cheers,
    Mary-Katie
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Daniel Traister <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 30 Jan 1994 19:42:58 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0076  Q: Romantic Lists
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0076  Q: Romantic Lists
 
Kimberly Nolan, with a Miami e-mail address, asks:
 
> I have been bragging about the vast knowledge of the participants on
> SHAKSPER, so now one of my colleagues has asked me to put out a query.
> Does anyone know of a good list for the European Romantics or for
> 19th Century French literature?  Just how specific do most of these
> electronic conferences get?  Could she find a list just for Goethe, or
> Baudelaire?  Any help or suggestion will be appreciated.
 
While there is no special reason to assume that a list of Shakespearians
will know the answer(s) to such a query, there is *every* reason to assume
that someone in your own library's reference department *will* know it/them.
I heartily recommend that you seek out Nora Jane Quinlan at your library.
If she does not know how to answer this question herself, she will know
someone at Miami who does.  In any case, someone in that Department is
also likely to be willing to introduce you to a gopher and thus to a kind
of gateway to e-lists.
 
The only excuse for posting so specific a reply to the entire list, need I
add, is that, while the names of the resource people will obviously differ
at other institutions, there is almost invariably someone in *your*
library whose *business* it is to know how to answer just this sort of
question.  And they *are* resources whom it is occasionally worth meeting.
 
                        Dan Traister, Special Collections
                        Van Pelt-Dietrich Library
                        University of Pennsylvania
                        This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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