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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: January ::
CFP: American Society for Theatre Research 1994
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0028. Wednesday, 12 January 1994.
 
From:           Dennis Kennedy <
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Date:           Tuesday, 11 Jan 1994 17:56 EST
Subject:        CALL FOR PAPERS - ASTR 1994
 
                           CALL FOR PAPERS
 
                          ****************
 
                         ANNUAL MEETING 1994
 
                American Society for Theatre Research
                   and Theatre Library Association
 
                           New York City
                        18-20 November 1994
 
            Lincoln Center Library for the Performing Arts
             CUNY Graduate Center and Milford Plaza Hotel
 
******************************************************************************
                "THEATRE IN CRISIS / THEATRE OF CRISIS"
 
The 1994 ASTR/TLA Annual Meeting will take up the topic of theatre and
crisis.  Papers are invited on theatrical practices in a state of crisis and
on performances that represent or illustrate crisis.  While theatre and
performance seem in crisis at the present moment in much of the world, the
conference also seeks plenary and seminar papers that investigate the crises
of other times and places.  In addition, papers may focus on the theoretical
or historiographical aspects of the concept of crisis.
 
PLENARY SESSION TOPICS might include (but are not limited to) issues such as
historical or contemporary crises in playwriting, acting, directing, design,
or criticism; crises in the representation of the body, gender, race, class,
or nationality; crises relating to finance, subsidy, theatrical unions,
employment, or training; political and cultural contexts of crisis;
substitutes and surrogates deriving from and challenging theatre (film, tv,
performance art, stand-up comedy, Tanztheater, etc.); the drama of crisis;
national theatrical traditions in crisis; minorities or marginalized groups in
performance (e.g., gay and lesbian theatre, race-specific theatre); theatre in
the Third World; theatre in the former socialist states; performance spaces as
negotiations of crisis; and philosophic, methodological, or historiographic
investigations of crisis as an idea or metaphor.
 
     Proposals (2-3 pages) or short papers relevant to the conference theme
           should arrive (in 3 copies) by 4 April 1994, mailed to:
 
                      Professor Dennis Kennedy
                     Department of Theatre Arts
                      University of Pittsburgh
                        Pittsburgh, PA 15260
 
               Notification will be in early June 1994
 
               Program Committee for 1994 Annual Meeting:
             Sally Banes, University of Wisconsin-Madison
              Marvin Carlson, City University of New York
           Sue-Ellen Case, University of California, Riverside
            Dennis Kennedy, University of Pittsburgh (chair)
             David Kuhns, Washington University, St. Louis
                 Thomas Postlewait, Indiana University
                 Sheila Stowell, University of Victoria
 
                        DETAILS OF SEMINARS FOLLOW
          Please note that all presenters must be members of ASTR
 
******************************************************************************
                              ASTR SEMINARS
 
Seminars provide an opportunity for extended discussion of specific issues in
an intimate setting.  Each seminar will last two hours and 15 minutes and
will include approximately seven participants.  The participants will prepare
short papers or position statements by 1 October 1994, which will be
distributed to the other seminarians prior to the meeting.  Proposals of 1-2
pages should be sent by 5 April 1994 to individual seminar leaders; please
submit one proposal only.  Notification will be in early 1 June 1994.
 
SEMINAR 1: PERFORMANCE ART: A PERMANENT CRISIS IN THE THEATRE
Performance art exists at the boundary of theatre for the purpose of
challenging the very existence of that boundary.  How does it contest the gap
between theatre and life, and between drama and its other?  Does it afford a
place at the margin for those already marginalized by way of race, class, and
gender?  Does it articulate alterity?  Does it destabilize hegemonic
discourse?  What is the history of performance art, and what is its current
status?
Professor Sally Banes
Dance Program, Lathrop Hall, 1050 University Avenue,
University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706
 
SEMINAR 2:INTER/MULTICULTURIST BORROWING AS FLASHPOINT OF CRISIS
Western theatre has long borrowed from non-western (primarily Asian and
Indian) performance, and vice-versa.  Is such western borrowing, in the past
and in the present, another instance of Orientalism, in Said's sense D the
theatrical staging of another culture in order to reduce it to a mystified,
often feminized object that only strengthens the identity of western culture?
Can the theatre respond without hegemony to the call for a multicultural
"celebration of difference"?  What are the epistemological terms and
political effects of cross-borrowing?
Professor Sarah Bryant-Bertail
School of Theatre, DX 20, University of Washington, Seattle WA 98177
 
SEMINAR 3: THE PROFESSION IN CRISIS
Is there a crisis today in the profession of theatre history, theory, and
criticism, and if so, what has brought it about and what results arise from
it?  What is or should be the goal, the concern, the organization of academic
theatre?  Does the academic theatre as it is organized in North America
(particularly when it includes both the study and practice of theatre)
provide a special locus of power and authority?  Is academic theatre a unique
site for the study of performance, representation, text, and theory?  How
successfully does the structure of academic societies, conferences, and
publishing serve the needs of the profession?  Has the growth of a more
specialized theoretical vocabulary created a serious problem in the
profession?
Professor Marvin Carlson
Theatre Program, CUNY Graduate Center, 33 West 42nd Street, New York NY 10036
 
SEMINAR 4: THEATRE 2000: THE CHALLENGE OF TECHNOLOGY TO THE STAGE
With the oncoming reality of cyberspace, what is the challenge to "live"
performance in the future?  How can we reimagine the body, sexuality, set
design, audience (virtual communities), and performance itself in the present
or in the future?  How can "differences" be maintained?  Similarly, from the
vantage point of the late twentieth century, how can we reconfigure our
critical perspective on the past D radically alter how we view the history
of the body, the stage, and performance?
Professor Sue-Ellen Case
Department of English, Swarthmore College, Swarthmore PA 19081
 
SEMINAR 5: THE CRISIS IN FEMINIST/POLITICAL THEATRE IN THE U.S.
Recently Erika Munk has suggested that an unbridgeable split exists between
academe and "the world," and that little feminist (or political) theatre has
been produced in the U.S. since the last generation of feminist playwrights.
Can theatre within the academy provide a site for feminist/activist work, or
is there a "narrowness" and "insularity" (Munk) about academe that precludes a
political project?  Is the academy (and most professional theatre) a site of
such bourgeois privilege that it renders the political a form of "radical
chic"?  Can academic theatre be anything but pedagogical?  Can a pedagogical
theatre function subversively?  Can feminist theatre, in any context, provide
a space for counter-hegemonic, or politically just, work on race, sexuality,
or class?  Or does feminist theatre, by definition, privilege gender/sexism in
ways that consign issues of racism, heterosexism, and class privilege to
secondary status?
Professor Kate Davy
Dean's Office, School of Fine Arts, University of California, Irvine CA 92717
 
SEMINAR 6: CULTURAL IDENTITY AND CRISIS
This seminar hopes to examine how the theatrical medium has been used to
confront issues of cultural identity and/in periods of cultural crisis.  How
has the theatre been a voice for emerging marginalized minorities struggling
with issues of cultural identity?  How has the theatre helped previously
disenfranchised groups to define themselves as well as their cultural,
political, and social agendas?  How has the theatre served to reclaim and
reformulate cultural images that were previously determined by the dominant
culture?
Professor Harry J. Elam, Jr.
Department of Drama, Mem. Aud. 144, Stanford University, Stanford CA 94305
 
SEMINAR 7: THE CRISIS OF OR FOR THE AUDIENCE
Often in moments of cultural shift, audience response patterns have helped to
signal the existence and nature of a crisis.  How has audience behavior
contributed to performance that defines moments of historical crisis?  How
have the aesthetic, social, political, economic, or moral conditions of
audiences affected notions of crisis within and without the theatre?  How
have audiences formed by "real-life" contexts outside of the theatre (in
political demonstrations, for example) performed crisis?  Proposals on any
period are welcome, as well as those that attempt to define the problems, or
propose models for the analysis of, audience "performance."
Professor David F. Kuhns
Performing Arts Department, Washington University, St. Louis MO 63130-4899
 
SEMINAR 8: THEATRE AND THE CRISIS OF A FIN-DE-SIECLE
How has the theatre reflected, anticipated, or responded to the perceived
crisis of a fin-de-siecle?  What are the larger social and cultural
implications of a century's (or millennium's) close, as well as the manner in
which such disturbances have been registered by a broadly defined theatre
community?  Proposals on theatre, drama, and performance at our own fin-de-
siecle are welcome, and considerations of parallel issues in the 1890s,
1790s, 1690s, 1590s, 1490s, or 1390s.
Professors Sheila Stowell and Joel Kaplan
c/o Department of Theatre, P.O. Box 1700,
University of Victoria, Victoria, B.C., CANADA V8W 2Y2
 
SEMINAR 9: MACRO-HISTORY OR MICRO-HISTORIES
The growing awareness and recognition of multicultural theatrical practices
and performance traditions has encouraged nationally, regionally,
linguistically, and culturally focused discourse as the "Eurocentric-
Aristotlean" model breaks down.  But no current historiographic discourse
seems adequate to address issues of general theatrical performance or its
history.  Is it possible to develop a theoretical framework large enough and
flexible enough to accommodate the various micro-histories and support an
overarching macro-history?  Or is theatre historiography necessarily limited
by historians' culturally defined perspectives?  Is general and comparative
history possible or even desirable?  Or are historical studies more properly
to be conceived as discreet discourses for discreet communities?
Professor Ronald Vince
Department of Drama, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont., CANADA L8S 4L9
 

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