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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: January ::
Re: Hypertext Shakespeare
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0040.  Sunday, 16 January 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Steven Urkowitz <SURCC@CUNYVM>
        Date:   Saturday, 15 Jan 94 13:11:27 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0026  Hypertext Shakespeare
 
(2)     From:   Dennis Kennedy <
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        Date:   Saturday, 15 Jan 1994 12:28 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0035  Re: Hypertext and Shakespeare
 
(3)     From:   Vint Cerf <
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        Date:   Sunday, 16 Jan 94 10:53 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0035  Re: Hypertext and Shakespeare
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steven Urkowitz <SURCC@CUNYVM>
Date:           Saturday, 15 Jan 94 13:11:27 EST
Subject: 5.0026  Hypertext Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0026  Hypertext Shakespeare
 
For Michael Best, a wish-list item:  perhaps a file of promptbooks available in
libraries and archives?  Randy McLeod has generated a geographical finding-list
from the play-by-play Shattuck PROMPTBOOKS volume.
 
The hypertext imagination grows by leaps and un-bounds . . .
 
                                          Thank you for your labors.
                                               Urk
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dennis Kennedy <
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 >
Date:           Saturday, 15 Jan 1994 12:28 EST
Subject: 5.0035  Re: Hypertext and Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0035  Re: Hypertext and Shakespeare
 
Bookworm Elctronic Publications of Nashville is producing a CD-Rom hypertext
edition of four popular Shakespeare plays, called The Shakespeare Quartet.
Intended for classroom and other pedogogic use, it will include R&J, MSD,
Hamlet, and Tempest in the Globe texts.  The engine, as they call it, will
allow the reader to call up textual and interpretative commentary, biblio-
graphic assistance, and performance history with pictures - all by highlighting
the lines at issue, or by referring to more general or thematic issues
relevant to the plays.  Its list price, I believe, will be about $50.
 
I know of this because they have leased the electronic rights to my book,
Looking at Shakespeare, for the pictures and performance commentary.  I
know that other scholars have been involved as well.  But I have not yet
seen the final product, so can make no comment on its value.
 
It will work in both Mac and MS/DOS environments.  Whether or not you
agree with the value of electronic-based study, I suspect this kind of
project will be used quite heavily in the future.
 
Dennis Kennedy, University of Pittsburgh Theatre Arts
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Vint Cerf <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Sunday, 16 Jan 94 10:53 EST
Subject: 5.0035  Re: Hypertext and Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0035  Re: Hypertext and Shakespeare
 
Michael,
 
Your questions are good ones. On the whole, it seems to me that one can readily
abuse almost any medium, hypertext included. One can also take traditional book
formats and totally abuse them by producing a completely disorganized rendering
of some particular topic.
 
One can produce a hypertext which can be read linearly, but which lends itself
to appeal to ancillary information if the reader is so inclined. Michael
Crichton's Jurassic Park, for example, is published in a hypertext format by
Voyager Press. There are no special clues for hypertext links visible, but one
can click on any word and may be vectored off to a link (usually to a rendering
and sound recording of a particular dinosaur). I think there is enough
flexibility in the concept of hypertext to allow an author to make the links as
apparent or a subtle as he or she desires. One could even turn on or off the
markings, classify them and render only those the reader desires, etc.
 
Vint
 

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