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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: January ::
Re: Sack, Ale, and Stout
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0047. Thursday, 20 January 1994.
 
(1)     From:   William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
        Date:   Wednesday, 19 Jan 1994 17:18:17 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0043 Re: Sack, Ale, and Stout with Some Questions
 
(2)     From:   Nancy W Miller <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 19 Jan 94 18:26:11 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0043 Re: Sack, Ale, and Stout with Some Questions
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
Date:           Wednesday, 19 Jan 1994 17:18:17 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0043 Re: Sack, Ale, and Stout with Some Questions
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0043 Re: Sack, Ale, and Stout with Some Questions
 
To Nate Johnson's question about beer, I gather that ale was more popular than
beer. Queen Elizabeth apparently couldn't leave home without it. There are
stories that she flew into a dreadful rage when her ale became too sweet
because of the warm weather. When local brewers couldn't satisfy her taste,
she's command that London brewers come out into the provinces to brew her a
barrel of the good stuff. And to shift realities, Christopher Sly had a taste
for small ale.
 
Eleanour Rummyng's tunning was apparently for the women of her community, saith
John Skelton, Laureate.
 
And I've drunk Falstaff beer, but I haven't seen it lately. There was a picture
of Santa Claus on the label - I think.
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nancy W Miller <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 19 Jan 94 18:26:11 EST
Subject: 5.0043 Re: Sack, Ale, and Stout with Some Questions
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0043 Re: Sack, Ale, and Stout with Some Questions
 
Re: beer in Elizabethan England: Judging from 17th century conduct books and
household guides, brewing was a standard domestic skill for the early modern
housewife (along with cooking, preserving, needlework, and physic).  I can't
speak for commercial brewing, but certainly homebrewing was widespread.
 

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