1994

Re: Reading the Sonnets

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0022.  Tuesday, 11 January 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Skip Shand <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 10 Jan 1994 07:53 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0019  Reading the Sonnets
 
(2)     From:   James McKenna <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 10 Jan 1994 23:53:34 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: sonnets
 
(3)     From:   Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, January 11, 1994
        Subj:   Reading the Sonnets
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Skip Shand <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 10 Jan 1994 07:53 EDT
Subject: 5.0019  Reading the Sonnets
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0019  Reading the Sonnets
 
Simon Callow has a wonderful section on his one-man Sonnets show in
*Being an Actor*. (Benedict Nightingale, I believe it was, thought Callow's
performance uninteresting, observed that perhaps it would have been more
interesting if Callow had performed the poems with a ferret down his
trousers!) Best of luck with your reading (and beware of critics bearing
ferrets).
                                        Skip Shand
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James McKenna <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 10 Jan 1994 23:53:34 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Re: sonnets
 
I wouldn't skip any of them, and I think it's valuable to read a smattering of
other Elizabethan sonneteers for context.  Spenser's AMORETTI are very
accessible, as are many of Sidney's sonnets and songs from ASTROPHIL AND
STELLA.  (The Musicians of Swanne Alley have recorded Elizabethan settings of a
few of Sidney's songs--recording title: AS I WENT TO WALSINGHAM).  Michael
Drayton and Barnabe Barnes can give you an earthier view of things.  For an
edition of the sonnets, Stephen Booth's *heavily* annotated edition is great
for a conversation starter (SHAKESPEARE'S SONNETS. Yale, 1977).  Read the notes
for each sonnet first, then read the sonnet itself.  Mmmm-mmm.  Beauty too rich
for use, for earth too dear.
 
James McKenna
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(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, January 11, 1994
Subject:        Reading the Sonnets
 
I would encourage you to read the sonnets in the order they were originally
published in 1609.  Having said this, you might, nevertheless, consider
beginning with Sonnet 144:
 
        TWo loues I haue of comfort  and di|spaire,
        Which like two |spirits do |sugie{|st} me {|st}ill,
        The better angell is a man right faire:
        The wor|ser |spirit a woman collour'd il.
        To win me |soone to hell my femall euill,
        Tempteth my better angel from my {|si}ght,
        And would corrupt my |saint to be a diuel:
        Wooing his purity with her fowle pride.
        And whether that my angel be turn'd {fi}nde,
        Su|spe{ct} I may,yet not dire{ct}ly tell,
        But being both from me both to each friend,
        I ge{|s|s}e one angel in an others hel.
          Yet this {|sh}al I nere know but liue in doubt,
          Till my bad angel {fi}re my good one out.
 
I should also point out that the sonnets are often used as exercise pieces
by Shakespearean actors.  For further information on this point, see Barton's
*Playing Shakespeare*, a book I mentioned in the discussion of Reading, Seeing,
Hearing . . . Shakespeare.  In "Chapter Six: Using the Sonnets," Barton
writes (or speaks, since the book is based on a Channel Four, London Weekend
Television series), ". . . sonnets can be excellent exercise pieces for actors.
Most of the textual and verbal points that come up in working on the plays
appear in the sonnets in concentrated form."
 
Finally, Caedmon has a set of two audio cassettes (CPN 241) of John Gielgud
reading most of the 154 sonnets, which are well worth a listen or two or three
or . . .

Re: Model for Multimedia Shakespeare

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0021.  Monday, 10 January 1994.
 
From:           Tom Davey <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 09 Jan 94 21:45 PST
Subject: Model for Multimedia Shakespeare
Comment:        SHK 5.0018  Model for Multimedia Shakespeare
 
>A CD-ROM based multimedia novella for the MacIntosh, reviewed in the
>November 1993 *Computer Gaming World*, pp. 36-38, looks as if it might
>serve as a model for multimedia Shakespeare.
 
The Compton's product indeed sounds very interesting, but I think that the
period for modeling has ended. Shakespeare multimedia is already here. I've
been fortunate enough to see a demo of the Voyager Company's _MacBeth_, and
it's a stunner. The product will be unveiled at a Macintosh trade show this
month.
 
The Voyager CD-ROM contains a complete Quicktime film of the play (a supposedly
excellent ITV production from the '70's; I don't know it), generous additional
clips from the Welles, Kurosawa, and Polanski films, and the complete New
Cambridge version of the play, edited by UCLA's Al Braunmuller. The entire text
of the print edition, including the critical apparatus, is included and
reincarnated with comprehensive hypertext (i.e., links between the text and
video, stills, maps, etc.) Braunmuller has even added a bit more material for
the Voyager edition.
 
A "dramaturgical apparatus" is also included, with various performance aids.
This was put together by UCLA drama faculty. And there's karaoke, enabling
viewers to speak lines along with the films as the text scrolls on the screen.
 
In short, it's rich product. I should note that I am a graduate student in the
English department at UCLA, so take that into account when evaluating my
enthusiasm.
 
As a side note, I already own a "multimedia MacBeth," this one from IBM's
Multimedia Publishing Studio. It's a poor product, in my opinion, and I don't
recommend it.
 
If you have a chance to see the Voyager _MacBeth_, though, leap at it.
Macintosh only, alas. The Voyager personnel at the demo asked us academics,
rather plaintively, whom we thought the audience (i.e., market) might be for
this product. They have little idea how well this might sell or how it might be
used. This list, I imagine, will have plenty of ideas on that score.
 
   Tom Davey
   Department of English, UC Los Angeles
   This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Reading the Sonnets

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0019.  Monday, 10 January 1994.
 
From:           Blair Kelly III <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 9 Jan 1994 19:48:53 -0500
Subject:        Recommendations on how to read the Sonnets
 
I would appreciate comments from people with more experience than I
about reading the Sonnets.  The Washington Shakespeare Reading Group
meets approximately once a fortnight and reads in an evening one of the
plays of the Bard (with each member reading a different character).  I
thought it might be interesting instead of reading a play to read some
or all of the Sonnets.  Is this a good idea?  Do you have a preferred
order, or ones you omit when teaching?  Any recommendations on how to
proceed would be welcome.
 
By the way if any SHAKSPEReans in the Washington, DC, area would like
to join us, our upcoming readings are:
 
Sat 22 Jan  Troilus and Cressida
Fri  4 Feb  Measure for Measure
Sat 26 Feb  Othello
 
Our meetings begin promptly at 7:30 pm in the basement of the
Palisades Community Church, 5200 Cathedral Avenue, NW.
---
Blair Kelly III            This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Secretary, Washington Shakespeare Reading Group

Re: Thinness

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0020.  Monday, 10 January 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Steve Urkowitz <SURCC@CUNYVM>
        Date:   Sunday, 09 Jan 94 21:02:25 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0014  Re: E-Mail: A Thin Communication Medium?
 
(2)     From:   William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
        Date:   Sunday, 09 Jan 1994 21:49:13 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0017  Re: Thinness
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steve Urkowitz <SURCC@CUNYVM>
Date:           Sunday, 09 Jan 94 21:02:25 EST
Subject: 5.0014  Re: E-Mail: A Thin Communication Medium?
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0014  Re: E-Mail: A Thin Communication Medium?
 
----------hmmmmm--------a thin communication medium.  Seems like what we used
to call "a script."  Seems like those old players used to have their writers
sit down with them and read the scripts out loud, all the way through, maybe
to avoid confusion in the distribution system when all networks were down.  One
way to thicken communication, whether face-to-face or in the thin atmosphere of
scripted transmission, is to offer a quizzical "hey, wha'?"  And then the
script writer tries again, louder, or clearer, or different.  Sometimes we call
that second shot "revision."  Or sometimes, without the listeners' prompts, we
can think of it as a recursive or redundant style, as the writer or speaker
listens to herself and goes back over the same ground.  You might like to look
at a neatly scripted instance: the line where the gravedigger scans the thin
medium of Yorick's skull, trying to find its wit.  It and its context appear
three different ways in Q1, Q2 and F HAMLET, and I'd argue that we'd get a
"thicker" experience of HAMLET if editors would think to lay these redundancies
out for us to see .  But that would be asking editors to open up multiple
possibilities where they instead feel obliged to present straight and narrowly
unambiguous text, authoritative text.  Ah, well.
 
                           Joy of the New Year to all,
                               Steve Urthickowitz SURCC@CUNYVM
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
Date:           Sunday, 09 Jan 1994 21:49:13 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0017  Re: Thinness
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0017  Re: Thinness
 
Jim McKenna reminds me of Walker Percy. Need we be reminded that we are all
Lost in the Cosmos, and that the person we know best in this world remains the
primary mystery for us? If we were to live inside Jonson's skin, inside Joyce's
brain, what would we know that we don't already know? The question is only one
half rhetorical.
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk

Model for Multimedia Shakespeare

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0018.  Sunday, 9 January 1994.
 
From:           Mathilda M. Hills <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 09 Jan 94 16:43:47 EST
Subject:        Model for Multimedia Shakespeare
 
A CD-ROM based multimedia novella for the MacIntosh, reviewed in the
November 1993 *Computer Gaming World*, pp. 36-38, looks as if it might
serve as a model for multimedia Shakespeare.  The reviewer, Maxwell
Eden, writes, *The Madness of Roland* . . . offers a dynamic medium for
interpreting the written word, while exposing the intriguing tapestry of
medieval knights, sorcery and romance to an entirely new, computer
literate and mature audience.   Combining an electronic book format with
elements of a movie, *The Madness of Roland* is a pastiche of
technology, interwoven with a rich use of language, classical works of
art and contemporary images. . . . Primarily text-based, *Roland* is
creatively embellished . . . featuring QuickTime video (which lets the
Macintosh play back movies like a VCR), original film and music,
256-color graphics, . . .animation, sound effects plus character
narration performed by actors.
 
This sounds too good to be true. It is available from Compton's New
Media at 800/862-2206.  (I have no commercial interest in the product or
the company.)
 
Remembering last year that fellow SHAKSPERian Michael Best was engaged
in a multimedia Shakespeare project, I thought this item would be of
interest.
 
Mathilda Hills, University of Rhode Island
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