1994

Re: Folio-Based Editions; Abridged MND; R3 and

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0294.  Thursday, 31 March 1994.
 
(1)     From:   William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Mar 1994 22:52:44 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Folio edition
 
(2)     From:   Kurt Daw <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 31 Mar 94 08:30:24 EST
        Subj:   Re: Folio editions
 
(3)     From:   David M Richman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Mar 1994 13:49:51 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0286 Q: Abridged *MND*; Re: Three-Toad Crest
 
(4)     From:   Tom Dale Keever <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 31 Mar 94 02:12:11 EST
        Subj:   Re: Richard III and _The Daughter of Time_
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Mar 1994 22:52:44 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Folio edition
 
Michael:
 
Yes, you remember correctly. I tried to use the Hinman Folio (when it cost
$12.50 a copy) as an undergraduate text. And you remember correctly that the
students quickly returned to their modernized texts with footnotes. So much for
my noble experiment.
 
What I am proposing at present is a modernized student edition with footnotes
and with the text based on the Folio (1623). You might wish to look at Margreta
de Grazia's SHAKESPEARE VERBATIM: THE REPRODUCTION OF AUTHENTICITY AND THE 1790
APPARATUS. It seems to me that a good deal of contemporary scholarship leads
with an insidious intent to a Folio based text with a companion text based on
the Quartos. This project will give Shakespearean scholars a good deal of work
to do As Bernice Kliman has recently pointed out, some (if not many) of our
judgments about the plays are wrong because we are misled by our texts, texts
that have been created by editors over the last three hundred years. Editorial
decisions have become canonized (when they should be cannonized). I admit that
I have been fooled when I have tried to make a subtle point WITHOUT consulting
the Folio and/or the Quarto.
 
But I gather from the relative silence that no such project is waiting in the
wings and that no one (?) is very enthusiastic.
 
Oh, well.
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kurt Daw <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 31 Mar 94 08:30:24 EST
Subject:        Re: Folio editions
 
Re: Michael Young's question:  "Could our undergraduates understand a nonedited
text?"
 
As a performance teacher I can only echo Bill G.'s appeal for a good
folio-based edition.  I have frequently taught from modern typeface editions of
folio texts and find that acting students, at least, discover these texts to be
at least as accessible as modern editions.  The simplest explanation I can
offer for this is that the considerably lighter puncuation of the folio is a
far better guide as to how the texts are to be spoken aloud than modern
editions offer.  Speaking the texts aloud well usually leads to quicker and
deeper insights on my student's parts than does extensive discussion.
 
Perhaps my students are odd, but the elaborate footnoting of modern editions is
often more confusing that enlightening to them.  So much minutiae gets a note
while big issues and questions go unexplored.
 
The biggest problem with using folio-based materials as a teaching approach is
that modern typeface folio texts are hard to come by. One source (with which I
have no commercial connection) is a series called Shakespeare's Globe Acting
Editions, M.H. Publications, 17 West Heath Drive, London, NW11 7QG, UK.  At $66
per play these are fairly expnsive but they come with unlimited photocopy
rights for teaching and production.
 
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David M Richman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Mar 1994 13:49:51 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0286 Q: Abridged *MND*; Re: Three-Toad Crest
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0286 Q: Abridged *MND*; Re: Three-Toad Crest
 
I am directing a ninety-minute MND, which is touring to high schools and middle
schools in New Hampshire.  Eight performers, two vans.  I made the abridgements
with sadness--it is a desecration to cut so perfect a play. On the other hand,
it is important to bring this play, live, to many who have never seen live
theatre. I can send the script to the Shaksper fileserver, or directly to the
interested parties.  Is there sufficient interest to warrant a fileserver
mounting?
 
David Richman
University of New Hampshire
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Dale Keever <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 31 Mar 94 02:12:11 EST
Subject:        Re: Richard III and _The Daughter of Time_
 
_Daughter of Time_ is an entertaining read, but unreliable history.  Elizabeth
MacKintosh, writing under the pen name "Josephine Tey," based her story on only
one source, Sir Clements R. Markham, who laid out his combative revisionist
theory in _The English Historical Review_ in 1891 and later expanded it for a
book length 1906 bio, _Richard III: His Life and Character_.
 
Markham was an energetic and opinionated crank with no qualifications or
ability as an historian or as much else besides a clubby Victorian/Edwardian
gentleman with independent means, society connections and a full complement of
Colonel Blimpish bigotries.  This lack did not prevent him from weighing in
with strong opinions on numerous erudite topics from medieval history to polar
exploration.  As one of the chief fund-raisers on the committee sponsoring
Scott's South Pole expedition, for instance, he threw his intimidating weight
against the suggestion that the explorer consider using dog sleds and skis. (
No! by thunder! Let lesser races do what they will, ENGLISHMEN will conquer the
pole with stout British ponies! ) Thanks to "Tey's" unearthing his justly
neglected work almost a half century later his pernicious effect on the popular
mythology surrounding Richard has been longer lived, though less tragic, than
his impact on the hapless Scott.
 
"Tey" may have read nothing more than Markham's opening salvo in The EHR -
almost all the points she built her detective's "case" on are there.  She
certainly looked no further than his work for evidence.  Had she done so she'd
have learned that several contemporary experts, including the age's recognized
authority on the period, James Gairdner, had blown large holes in Markham's
theory, whose central point was that Henry VII, not Richard, had murdered the
princes in the tower.  She also ignored two discoveries in the 1930's that sank
it once and for all.
 
The first was the unearthing in Vatican archives of "The Mancini Manuscript,"
an Italian cleric's 1483 communique to the Pope reporting on events in London.
Mancini shreds Markham's fanciful portrait of a London public confident that
the young princes were safe in the care of their loving uncle.  We now know
that the boys disappeared from public view early in Richard's reign and that
more than a few of his subjects suspected the worst.
 
A biography by Philip Lindsay in 1933 revived Markham's indictment of Henry
VII.  In July of that year the bones that had been discovered in The Tower in
1674, long presumed to be those of Edward IV's young sons, were finally
disinterred and examined. The results, published in the journal _Archaeologia_
the following year, concluded that the elder of the two boys was between twelve
and thirteen when he died and the younger between nine and eleven.  The boys
were almost certainly killed before the end of 1483.  Though this does not
prove that Richard ordered them murdered ( personally, I suspect Buckingham )
it does exonerate Henry VII, who entered London two years later.
 
I agree that Saccio is the beginning Shakespearean's best introduction to these
complex matters and that Kendall is good reading, but the definitive modern
works on Richard and his age are Charles Ross' biographies of Richard and of
Edward IV, both published by U. of California Press.  "Tey" fans, and I count
myself one, should read Colin Dexter's recent homage, _The Wench is Dead_, in
which a bed-ridden Inspector Morse unravels a nineteenth century murder mystery
and exposes a long hidden injustice.

The Sonnets; Belott; Authors and Productions

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0293.  Thursday, 31 March 1994.
 
(1)From:                John Rhoades <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Mar 94 20:10:47 EST
Subject:        The Sonnets
 
(2)From:                Timothy Bowden <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Mar 94 15:53:35 PST
Subject:        Young Friend Belott
 
(3)From:                John Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Mar 1994 15:01:07 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Authors and productions
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Rhoades <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Mar 94 20:10:47 EST
Subject:        The Sonnets
 
SHAKSPereans:
 
It seems that most of the discussion over the past few months has discussed
only the dramas, so under the category of something completely different, a
question for all of you.   In reading the sonnets, I was struck by how they
seem to function as a transition point between the Elizabethan sonnetteers and
seventeenth century poets such as Jonson and Herrick.  More specifically, it
seems that the absence (?) of a traditional sonnet woman and the absence of
stock sonnet machinery (especially war metaphors) paves the way for Jonson and
Herrick's poems portraying them as aging lovers.  I realize this is but the
sketchiest of arguments, but I would appreciate any feedback anyone could
offer.
 
Thanks in advance,
                  John Rhoades
                  Queen's University
                  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Timothy Bowden <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Mar 94 15:53:35 PST
Subject:        Young Friend Belott
 
I believe, with the recent shifting in the dates of the sonnets to directly
overlap at least a portion of the Poet's stay with the Mountjoys, and given
especially the identical objectives expressed in both the early poems and the
depositions in the Belott suit, we can say with some certainty the early
sonnets grew out of an exercise Shakespeare devised to fulfill the mission
urged on him by Mrs Mountjoy:  pressing the young man to marry.
 
There is at least as much authority for this finding as there is for any other
identity of any of the principals sketched by the poet, indeed more than for
most of the legend generally accepted in some quarters;  the deer poaching, the
holding of the horses, the Mermaid matches of wits with Jonson.
 
There.  A controversial claim raises the question where a meek inquiry passes
unnoticed.
 
Thanks to those who have responded, and shall.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
For those who think that having Shakespeare present at a production of one of
his plays, the following is instructive.  It's a short article from *The
Manchester Guardian Weekly* of March 27, 1994 (p. 11):
 
    Trustees of the estate of the playwright Samuel Beckett are so angered
with the interpretation of one of his plays in a production running in
London that they have declared its director will never stage his plays
again.
    Deborah Warner's production of Beckett's 20-minute play, Footfalls,
opened last week at the Garrick Theatre in the West End with Fiona Shaw in
the leading role.
    Their crime in the eyes of the trustees was in failing to comply with the
exacting instructions which the playwright insisted in his will should be
followed to the letter in every production of his plays.
    "We have not done anything about the fact that she has not followed all the
stage directions.  Life is too short, but she will not be doing Beckett again,"
said Leah Schmidt, literary agent to the playwright's nephew and heir, Edward
Beckett.
    Ms Warner greeted news of the ban with anger.  "It is with deepest regret
that I heard this news and urgently ask them to reconsider this position," she
said. "Plays are fluid things not objects; they can exist only by being
reinter-preted for each generation."
    The dispute has cost Ms Warner the option to take the production to Paris.
    Earlier, the trustees raised concerns that five lines of text had been
transposed from one character to another.  Ms Warner apologised and returned
to the original.
 
John Cox

Qs: AYI Weather/Music; MLA Project Volunteer;

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0290.  Thursday, 31 March 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Robert S. COHEN <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Mar 1994 07:31:38 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   As You weather and music
 
(2)     From:   Milla Riggio <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Mar 1994 17:12:10 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Computerized Shakespeare and the MLA
 
(3)     From:   Michael Caulfield <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 31 Mar 1994 01:58:59 -0500 (EST)|
        Subj:   Stylistics
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert S. COHEN <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Mar 1994 07:31:38 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        As You weather and music
 
Anybody have any thoughts about the weather conditions in the forest scenes of
AS YOU LIKE IT?  How much of the "icy fang And churlish chiding of the winter's
wind" does the exiled Duke and his pals actually face? I've seen Act II begin
in the snow, and in the summer, and even (in Munich once) in a steam bath for
the aged.  Any thoughts?
 
Also: anyone able to share with me some good contemporary scoring for the
songs?
 
Robert Cohen, UC Irvine Drama Department
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Milla Riggio <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Mar 1994 17:12:10 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Computerized Shakespeare and the MLA
 
Dear Fellow Shakesperians:
 
In the last stages of preparing a proposal - probably too long a proposal - for
the MLA, I find myself still in need of one gallant volunteer:  someone who
would be able to and would like to write a fairly brief introduction to a
section on computerizing the bard in the MLA volume on Teaching through
Performance:  this introduction would group the kinds of computer aids
available for those teaching Shakespeare; it would be accompanied by an
itemized check list of available computer materials (hypercard stacks and such
- none of which I understand yet, but which I'm sure I soon will).  The section
itself will highlight the in-progress MIT program, burt I need a good
introduction written by someone who knows what s/he is talking about to place
that in context.
 
Any takers?
 
Best,
Milla Riggio
[email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.]
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Caulfield <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 31 Mar 1994 01:58:59 -0500 (EST)|
Subject:        Stylistics
 
During a recent discussion with a friend it was mentioned that "Wilt thou, upon
the high and giddy mast" (from Henry IV, 2) had an undeniable Shakespearian
sound. I thought that it might have to do with the modification: the way in
which the connotations of "giddy" seem to jar slightly against those of "high".
I would be interested to hear of any ideas on this, other examples in S., or
works which might help with this question.
 
Michael Caulfield
Merrimack, NH

Announcments: Malone Society; Lit List Interviews

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0291.  Thursday, 31 March 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Thomas Berger <TBER@SLUMUS>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Mar 94 14:14:09 EST
        Subj:   malone society
 
(2)     From:   J. Scott Kemp <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, Mar 30 21:23:32 1994
        Subj:   Lit List Interview
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Thomas Berger <TBER@SLUMUS>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Mar 94 14:14:09 EST
Subject:        malone society
 
The Malone Society seeks new members.
 
Founded in 1906, the Malone Society was named after Edmond Malone, editor of
the first variorum edition of Shakespeare.  The Society's first General Editor
was W. W. Greg.  Now under the general editorship of Dr. Roger Holdsworth, it
continues to publish editions of Renaissance plays from manuscript,
photographic facsimiles of printed plays of the period, and editions of
original documents related to the drama.  These volumes, all of which contain
material not readily available elsewhere, maintain the high standard of a
ccuracy for which the Society is renowned.  They are indispensable to serious
students of English drama.
 
SPECIAL "SHAKSPER" OFFER
As part of its ongoing membership drive, the Malone Society is offering
new members two special packages:
 
(1) 2-4-1 (two for one):  Enroll as a member for 1994, and the
membership will include the 1993 volume, COLLECTIONS XV ($27.00 U.S.,
$35.00 Canadian) (COLLECTIONS XV includes a reprint of one of Ralph
Crane's transcripts of Middleton's A GAME AT CHESS; a reprint of the
part of 'Poore' in an otherwise unknown Jacobean play acted at Christ
Chruch, Oxford; a collection of records from the archives of the Middle
Temple, relating to dramatic and musical entertainments, 1613-1643; and
a letter from Sir Henry Killigrew to the Earl of Leicester enclosing
proposals for a fireworks display for Queen Elizabeth.)
 
(2) 3-4-1.5 (three for one and one half):  Enroll as a member for 1994,
and the membership will include the 1993 volume, COLLECTIONS XV and the
1992 volume, TOM A LINCOLN ($45.00 U.S., $52.00 Canadian).  (TOM A
LINCOLN, edited by Richard Proudfoot from BL Add MS 61745, dates from
1611-16 and is of historical interest not only for its echoes of
Shakespeare but for its burlesque of the conventions of romantic
narrative and romantic drama.)
 
Members also receive positively silly discounts on back volumes, special
treatment at the Malone Society Dance, and the (incalculable) good will of Tom
Berger and Ted McGee.
 
Please send inquiries to:
     Thomas L. Berger            C. E. McGee
     Department of English       Department of English
     St. Lawrence University     Univ. of St. Jerome's College
     Canton, NY 13617            Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G3
     U.S.A.                      CANADA
 
Thanks,
Tom Berger (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           J. Scott Kemp <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, Mar 30 21:23:32 1994
Subject:        Lit List Interview
 
Dear Colleagues,
 
Last call for any who would be interested in answering a "short" questionnaire
(6 questions) concerning the topic: "How Lit Lists are changing the way we
Discuss/Learn English/Literature"
 
Send request to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Attention: Last call!
 
Thanks so much to those who participated in this study.
 
Sincerely,
John Scott Kemp
Western Carolina University
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Re: Macbeth's Death; Macduff; Ophelia's Rue

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0289.  Thursday, 31 March 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Timothy Dayne Pinnow <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Mar 1994 11:00:53 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0284  Re: Macduff; Macbeth's Death
 
(2)     From:   William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Mar 1994 22:22:22 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0284  Re: Macduff; Macbeth's Death
 
(3)     From:   Jean Peterson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Mar 1994 14:17:50 -0500
        Subj:   ophelia's rue
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Timothy Dayne Pinnow <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Mar 1994 11:00:53 -0600
Subject: 5.0284  Re: Macduff; Macbeth's Death
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0284  Re: Macduff; Macbeth's Death
 
To all who responded to my query:
 
First off, many thanks for all the ideas concerning Macbeth's end.  I agree
with many of you, and if I were producing the whole play, I might not try
the different endings that I am drawn to in doing just the final battle.
But I am intrigued by the idea that Macbeth is NOT noble at the end of the
play.  In fact, I am fascinated by the idea that his ambition for
"everything" has left him with "nothing" (as in signifying) not even his
dignity.  It is the price he pays for losing his soul to power.
 
                 Timothy Dayne Pinnow
                 St. Olaf College
                 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Mar 1994 22:22:22 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0284  Re: Macduff; Macbeth's Death
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0284  Re: Macduff; Macbeth's Death
 
Macduff early on in the play indicates his mistrust of Macbeth, or so I read
the choric scene 2.4.20-38 (Signet ed.). Macbeth has betrayed his king (Duncan)
and his colleague (Banquo) before Macduff leaves for England. Why would Macduff
believe that Macbeth will not hold his family hostage? Were I Macbeth, I would.
Macbeth makes a mistake and kills Macduff's family. I think Lady Macduff's
comment to Ross (4,2,6-14) is telling. Her question remains unanswered.
 
Of course, Macduff is not a completely developed character, and he doesn't
indulge in Iago-like soliloquies, but I'm afraid I can't subdue my suspicions.
You say I'm cynical and quick to judge. You bet!
 
And if Macduff is indeed "Bellona's bridegroom" (1.2.54) who is fighting in
Fife (wouldn't you expect the Thane of Fife to lead the local fighting?), then
he is opposed to Macbeth early in the play. I realize that I may not be walking
on thin ice here; I may be walking directly on the water!
 
I think Shakespeare likes to suggest, hint, that the primary action of his
plays is not isolated. It goes on in a context, and that context is often
shadowy, illusive. I think Shakespeare depends on the active (paranoid) auditor
to fill it in. And don't we ever?
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jean Peterson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Mar 1994 14:17:50 -0500
Subject:        ophelia's rue
 
In Zeffirelli's film *Hamlet*, Helena Bonham-Carter's Ophelia hands the rue
to Claudius, delivering the line "You must wear YOUR rue with a difference"
with supremely nasty emphasis on "your." Just another staging
possibility...
 
Jean Peterson
Bucknell University

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