Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: March ::
Rs: Household Words; Psycho Macbeth; Third Murderer
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0166.  Tuesday, 1 March 1994.
 
(1)     From:   James Harner <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 28 Feb 1994 11:36:29 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   RE: SHK 5.0159  Re: Household Words
 
(2)     From:   Rick Jones <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 28 Feb 94 15:26:52 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0163  Re: Psycho Macbeth
 
(3)     From:   Sean Lawrence <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 28 Feb 1994 15:52:08 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0160  Re: The Third Murderer in *Macbeth*
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James Harner <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 28 Feb 1994 11:36:29 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 5.0159  Re: Household Words
Comment:        RE: SHK 5.0159  Re: Household Words
 
You might also consult two books by Charles A. Norrington:
  +Shakespeare, the Bible, Milton, and Others in Our Daily Conversation+.
     Victoria, Australia: Privately Printed, 1989.
  +Shakespeare's "Mirror up to Nature" with Highlights in Full: A
     Companion Booklet to Shakespeare, the Bible, Milton, and Others
     in Our Daily Conversation. Peterborough, Australia: Privately
     Printed, 1991.
 
                        Jim Harner
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Rick Jones <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 28 Feb 94 15:26:52 EST
Subject: 5.0163  Re: Psycho Macbeth
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0163  Re: Psycho Macbeth
 
It strikes me that James McKenna's suggestion that Renaissance audiences
shared with our own age the idea that extremes in behavior represent extremes
rather than abnormalities relies rather too heavily on democratic values.
The Renaissance conception of "degree" (qv. Agamemnon in _TC_, and even more
explicit in the plays of Lyly and Peele), makes such identifications more
difficult: tragic heroes are explicitly Not Like Us, and attempting to
transgress one's proper station is very much frowned upon.
 
Neo-classical critics misread Aristotle into saying that tragedy is the
province of kings.  I'd argue further that the monarchy is upheld in
Elizabethan plays in part by reinforcing the idea that kings may be like us
in some ways, but are ultimately Not Like Us.  Even a play like _Cambyses_,
in which a tyrant runs wild, suggests ultimately that only God's justice can
legitimately remove a duly installed monarch (bad monarchs exist, but are
God's means of punishing a wicked kingdom).  Marlowe's _Tamburlaine_ would be
a better known, though less explicit, example.  And it is surely not
coincidental that all the "bad monarchs" are removed by time or distance from
the present day: Richard III is about as close as we get to a recent,
English, real-life bad guy.  And guess whose grandfather deposed him?
 
I should also note that some of the most interesting recent work in classical
studies centers on the inherent conflict between the tragic hero and the
self-consciously (if not actually) democratic society in which the plays were
performed.
 
None of this means that Shakespeare necessarily bought into all the myths of
his age... just that he was certainly constrained by them, at least to some
extent.
 
Rick Jones

 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 28 Feb 1994 15:52:08 -0400
Subject: 5.0160  Re: The Third Murderer in *Macbeth*
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0160  Re: The Third Murderer in *Macbeth*
 
This belies my ignorance, but why is Ross so insidious?  He always seems to me
to be just a reasonably good man, in a rough stuation, and usually delivering
messages for others.  Though, of course, the role of courier might indicate a
deep cowardice, unwilling to assume any ideas of his own.
 
        Cheerio,
        Sean Lawrence.
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.