1994

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0170.  Wednesday, 2 March 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Jean Peterson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 1 Mar 1994 16:53:39 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0166  [Re: Ross]
 
(2)     From:   Robert White <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 01 Mar 1994 17:22:38 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re:  First Times with Shakespeare
 
(3)     From:   Patricia Palermo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 01 Mar 1994 16:56:46 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0164  Most Popular
 
(4)     From:   Patricia Gallagher <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 1 Mar 1994 21:08:21 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: *MND* on video
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jean Peterson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 1 Mar 1994 16:53:39 -0500
Subject: 5.0166  [Re: Ross]
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0166  [Re: Ross]
 
RE: Sean Lawrence's query about Ross (i.e., is Ross indeed insidious?).
 
I think there is a tendency for directorial choices to enter the cultural
"life" of a playtext with surprising tenacity: Polanski's choices create a
whole tradition of sinister Rosses, and it becomes an assumption that the part
must be played in this way (his only questionable action, as far as I recall,
is misguidedly reassuring Lady Macduff that all will be well; this could be
played as simple bad judgement--judgement as bad, in fact, as Macduff's).
 
I know I've seen entirely too many stage Mercutios who aped John McInery in the
Zeffirelli film--copying not only stage business, but vocal patterns and even
appearance.
 
Which is why SHAKESPERIANS living near Washington D.C. must betake themselves
to the Shakespeare Theater to catch Barry Kyle's *Romeo and Juliet*--a fresh,
original, inspired and utterly exhilarating staging!
 
Jean Peterson
Bucknell University
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert White <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 01 Mar 1994 17:22:38 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Re:  First Times with Shakespeare
 
I am struck with the number of respondents who have stated or implied that
memorization was an important element of their first significant encounter with
Shakespeare.  For me, it was a twelfth-grade assignment to memorize certain
passages from _Macbeth_; and to this day when the "Tomorrow and tomorrow" lines
ring in my mind, they enchant me.  For other respondents, a more or less
successful debut on stage did the trick.  Memorization is out of fashion as a
teaching method these days, but I wonder if we might be missing the boat by
abandoning it altogether.  I know of no better way to get students to absorb
the rhythms and beauty of language.  I wonder how many SHAKSPERians require
memory work of their students and how successful they've been with this
approach.
        Robert A. White, The Citadel
        This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Patricia Palermo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 01 Mar 1994 16:56:46 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 5.0164  Most Popular
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0164  Most Popular
 
Don Rowan asks which of Shakespeare's plays might be the most popular. If the
number of words written about a given play are any evidence of its popularity,
then _Hamlet_ wins hands down.
 
Patricia Palermo
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Patricia Gallagher <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 1 Mar 1994 21:08:21 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        Re: *MND* on video
 
According to "Shakespeare on Screen" by Rothwell & Melzer, there is a
video of the 1935 "Midsummer Night's Dream" available for sale from
Warner Brothers (price $19.95).

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