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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: March ::
Rs: Ross; First Times; Most Popular; *MND* Video
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0170.  Wednesday, 2 March 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Jean Peterson <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 1 Mar 1994 16:53:39 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0166  [Re: Ross]
 
(2)     From:   Robert White <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 01 Mar 1994 17:22:38 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re:  First Times with Shakespeare
 
(3)     From:   Patricia Palermo <PPALERMO@DREW.BITNET>
        Date:   Tuesday, 01 Mar 1994 16:56:46 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0164  Most Popular
 
(4)     From:   Patricia Gallagher <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 1 Mar 1994 21:08:21 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: *MND* on video
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jean Peterson <
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Date:           Tuesday, 1 Mar 1994 16:53:39 -0500
Subject: 5.0166  [Re: Ross]
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0166  [Re: Ross]
 
RE: Sean Lawrence's query about Ross (i.e., is Ross indeed insidious?).
 
I think there is a tendency for directorial choices to enter the cultural
"life" of a playtext with surprising tenacity: Polanski's choices create a
whole tradition of sinister Rosses, and it becomes an assumption that the part
must be played in this way (his only questionable action, as far as I recall,
is misguidedly reassuring Lady Macduff that all will be well; this could be
played as simple bad judgement--judgement as bad, in fact, as Macduff's).
 
I know I've seen entirely too many stage Mercutios who aped John McInery in the
Zeffirelli film--copying not only stage business, but vocal patterns and even
appearance.
 
Which is why SHAKESPERIANS living near Washington D.C. must betake themselves
to the Shakespeare Theater to catch Barry Kyle's *Romeo and Juliet*--a fresh,
original, inspired and utterly exhilarating staging!
 
Jean Peterson
Bucknell University
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert White <
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Date:           Tuesday, 01 Mar 1994 17:22:38 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Re:  First Times with Shakespeare
 
I am struck with the number of respondents who have stated or implied that
memorization was an important element of their first significant encounter with
Shakespeare.  For me, it was a twelfth-grade assignment to memorize certain
passages from _Macbeth_; and to this day when the "Tomorrow and tomorrow" lines
ring in my mind, they enchant me.  For other respondents, a more or less
successful debut on stage did the trick.  Memorization is out of fashion as a
teaching method these days, but I wonder if we might be missing the boat by
abandoning it altogether.  I know of no better way to get students to absorb
the rhythms and beauty of language.  I wonder how many SHAKSPERians require
memory work of their students and how successful they've been with this
approach.
        Robert A. White, The Citadel
        
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(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Patricia Palermo <PPALERMO@DREW.BITNET>
Date:           Tuesday, 01 Mar 1994 16:56:46 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 5.0164  Most Popular
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0164  Most Popular
 
Don Rowan asks which of Shakespeare's plays might be the most popular. If the
number of words written about a given play are any evidence of its popularity,
then _Hamlet_ wins hands down.
 
Patricia Palermo

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(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Patricia Gallagher <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 1 Mar 1994 21:08:21 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        Re: *MND* on video
 
According to "Shakespeare on Screen" by Rothwell & Melzer, there is a
video of the 1935 "Midsummer Night's Dream" available for sale from
Warner Brothers (price $19.95).
 

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