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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: March ::
Re: Ross
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0176.  Thursday, 3 March 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Kenneth S. Rothwell <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 2 Mar 1994 12:19:44 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0166 Third Murderer
 
(2)     From:   William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
        Date:   Wednesday, 02 Mar 1994 20:10:36 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0170  Ross
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kenneth S. Rothwell <
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 >
Date:           Wednesday, 2 Mar 1994 12:19:44 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0166 Third Murderer
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0166 Third Murderer
 
All this talk about the Third Murderer compels me to cite my analysis of the
role of that mysterious figure in the Polanksi MACBETH, though I recognize that
citing one's own publications may be either unethical  or a sign of
desperation. Using the theories of M.F. Libby, a Victorian schoomaster,
Polanski and Kenneth Tynan made Ross (I think it's Rosse in the Folio) into a
key figure in the play. As played by John Stride, he comes across as cynical,
manipulative, sinister (all of the above), a minor league Iago. If anyone's
interested, the full story is in K.S. Rothwell, "Roman Polanski's MACBETH: The
'Privileging' of Ross," THE CEA CRITIC, 46.1&2 (Fall & Winter 1983-84): 50-55.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
Date:           Wednesday, 02 Mar 1994 20:10:36 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0170  Ross
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0170  Ross
 
Regarding Ross, I think there is an article, much older than Polanski, that
argues that Ross(e) is the true villain. After all, Ross is always there. As I
recall, the article is listed some place in Muir's footnotes (Arden). But I
couldn't find it by glancing through. Sorry about that.
 
Bill Godshalk
 

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