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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: March ::
Re: Ohio Shakespeare Conference; Transmission of
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0201.  Tuesday, 8 March 1994.
 
(1)     From:   William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
        Date:   Sunday, 06 Mar 1994 21:44:51 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   The Ohio Shakespeare Conference
 
(2)     From:   Timothy Bowden <
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 >
        Date:   Monday, 07 Mar 94 09:58:04 PST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0196  Re: Transmission of the Quartos
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
Date:           Sunday, 06 Mar 1994 21:44:51 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        The Ohio Shakespeare Conference
 
I want to thank all the participants in the Conference. I hope you had a
wonderful time. I did - good papers, good talk, and conviviality.
 
Thanks.
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 
PS Remember to send your abstracts of Eva McManus, Department of English, Ohio
Northern University, Ada, OH 45810.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Timothy Bowden <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 07 Mar 94 09:58:04 PST
Subject: 5.0196  Re: Transmission of the Quartos
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0196  Re: Transmission of the Quartos
 
> From:           James McKenna <MCKENNJI@UCBEH>
 
> It seems to me that the problem is not whether plays are actual playtexts, bu
> who wrote them.  In the art world, no one has a problem accepting that works
> from this and later eras often come from "the studio of," not just from a
> single artist's brush.  I am notnotnotnotnotnotnot opening the authoriship
> question, which is just a shell game, but suggesting a smudgy idea that I'm
> sure is well developed elsewhere: maybe we should be thinking about "The Lord
> Chamberlain's Men's plays," rather than Shakespeare's.
 
I have often noted how vociferous is the defense by the Stratfordists, with
good reason, and then we all segue into a line-count in _King Henry VII_ of
Bard possibles, certainties, doubtfuls.  At least the thought of a concert of
hands on the tiller is more acceptable than the idea of noble ghostwriters...
 

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