Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: March ::
Re: Imagining Gloriana
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0216.  Friday, 11 March 1994.
 
(1)     From:   William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
        Date:   Thursday, 10 Mar 1994 20:39:51 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0208  Imagining Gloriana
 
(2)     From:   Luc Borot <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 11 Mar 1994 11:20:45 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0202  Imagining Gloriana
 
(3)     From:   Richard Shaw <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 10 Mar 1994 22:32:09 U
        Subj:   RE: SHK 5.0202  Imagining Gloriana
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
Date:           Thursday, 10 Mar 1994 20:39:51 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0208  Imagining Gloriana
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0208  Imagining Gloriana
 
To Phyllis Rackin,
 
The problem you describe is the problem of historicizing. If the historicists
are correct, it is impossible for us to break out of our historical moment. If
it was impossible for Shakespeare and Marlowe and Jonson, it's equally
impossible for me and thee. Herb Coursen recurrently points out to me how a
production is historically located, and then insists that we must historicize.
All we do by historicizing is add another layer of 20th century to the past.
 
And, Phyllis, you will have to admit that the picture of Gloriana that you
describe is also the picture given us by historians like Carolly Erickson who I
suppose is not a misogynist nor a dupe. At least, that's how I remember
Erickson's description of Elizabeth.
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Luc Borot <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 11 Mar 1994 11:20:45 -0500
Subject: 5.0202  Imagining Gloriana
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0202  Imagining Gloriana
 
        Michael,
 
The first that comes to my mind is of dubious origin, as it is, if one may call
it so, 'quoted' by Victor Hugo in his *Shakespeare* which was prefaced to his
son's translations of Shakespeare. At one stage, he enumerates events that were
taking place at dates supposed to be those when Bill was writing his plays.
When he comes to 1603, he says that Henry IV of France said on hearing of the
death of Queen Bess "elle etait vierge comme je suis catholique", but with Hugo
never mentioning his sources, it may be totally apocryphal.
 
To read Hugo's vision of Shakespeare-As-Romantic-Genius properly, one must bear
in mind that in all the lineage of Prophets and Geniuses from The-Mythology,
The-Bible and AAAArt, the only name missing, but permanently praetermitted by
Hugo is Hugo himself, who obviously writes on Shakespeare to feel in good
company with Isaiah, Jeremiah, Dante and folk of that ilk.
 
I hope this is not in excess or does not duplicate your material.
 
Yours,
Luc
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Shaw <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 10 Mar 1994 22:32:09 U
Subject: 5.0202  Imagining Gloriana
Comment:        RE: SHK 5.0202  Imagining Gloriana
 
You might try the Italian playwright Dario Fo's "Elizabeth: Almost by Chance a
Woman." Elizabeth suspects all of Shakespeare's characters are talking about
her. Most of the references are, of course, to Italian politics, but there is
an American version! It is published in Theater, 1987. There is a "letter"
prologue to Ronald Regan, "I know you are a sophisticated man of theatre who
understands the use of allegory ... so I don't want you to leap to any false
conclusions about possible parallels ... just because my play is about an aging
leader who tends to get confused and forgetful (and on and on with
non-parallels to) dying of your hair, face lifting, and "don't let anyone try
to convince you that Elizabeth's love for horses has anything to do with your
image as a galloping cowboy. ...
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.