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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: March ::
Re: Paulina and *WT*
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0218.  Saturday, 12 March 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Kenneth S. Rothwell <
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        Date:   Friday, 11 Mar 1994 08:39:09 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0207 Re: Paulina and *WT*
 
(2)     From:   Nicholas Ranson <R1NR@AKRONVM>
        Date:   Saturday, 12 Mar 94 09:02:23 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0203  Re: Paulina; Noh Lecture; Colonialism
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kenneth S. Rothwell <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 11 Mar 1994 08:39:09 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0207 Re: Paulina and *WT*
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0207 Re: Paulina and *WT*
 
I share Alex Bennet's enthusiasm for the WT statue scene in the Barton
"Playing Shakespeare" series. I was bowled over by it myself. I believe
that Paulina is played by Sinead Cusack. It's the 8th tape in the series
and available from Films for the Humanities in Princeton, NJ, or was
anyway. Ken Rothwell
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nicholas Ranson <R1NR@AKRONVM>
Date:           Saturday, 12 Mar 94 09:02:23 EST
Subject: 5.0203  Re: Paulina; Noh Lecture; Colonialism
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0203  Re: Paulina; Noh Lecture; Colonialism
 
The RSC production of 1987(?) at Stratford with Jeremy Irons and Penny Downie
as Hermione was pretty straight forward: my students loved the nylon bear with
the electric blue eyes which was flown on wires and then collapsed on top of
Antigonus as he defended the child Perdita--yes, it's not in the text but it
played well and is consistent with one view of A's character. The setting was
French  Empire, and the costumes the same. The second half had Leontes in a
wheelchair  throughout, until he rises at the incredible living statue
scene/moment: we liked the clumsy symbolism of his being literally in Paulina's
hands throughout  the second part, since she wheeled him everywhere. It was a
Terry Hands production, set by Gerald Howland, costumes (great ones) by
Alexander Reid. Hands also worked on the lighting.  But Oh! that bear . . .
backstage, we met it and it was something like 40' long and 25' wide: awesome.
Finally, Jeremy Irons as L. was a surprise: a clear, not strong, but gallery
reaching voice with precise enunciation, whose every syllable reached us. Oh
yes: nearly forgot: Time was flown on a wire to, a gay old geezer who set the
theme of reconciliation which the production reached for: no complicated
readings here. I think it got lukewarm critical appraisal: we loved it. Cheers.
Nick Ranson.
 

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