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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: March ::
Re: Imagining Gloriana
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0220.  Saturday, 12 March 1994.
 
(1)     From:   David M Richman <
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        Date:   Friday, 11 Mar 1994 14:17:55 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0202 Imagining Gloriana
 
(2)     From:   Michael Dobson <U63495@UICVM>
        Date:   Friday, 11 Mar 94 17:21:47 CST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0208  Imagining Gloriana
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David M Richman <
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Date:           Friday, 11 Mar 1994 14:17:55 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0202 Imagining Gloriana
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0202 Imagining Gloriana
 
Open letter to Michael Dobson on *Imagining Gloriana* Project:
 
I assume you are dealing with the 1953 Benjamin Britten opera *Gloriana*? The
opera got, and still gets, mixed reviews.  In Maxwell Anderson's play,
*Elizabeth the Queen* Shakespeare and his company are hauled before the Privy
Council over the *Richard II* and Essex flap.  There is also a weird and
ingenious time-travel fantasy, first published in 1963, called *No Great Magic*
by Fritz Leiber, about Elizabeth, the execution of Mary Stuart, and a
deliberately anachronistic performance of *Macbeth*.  Leiber is a gifted
fantasist whose father was a gifted Shakespearean actor.
 
Cheers--I will enjoy reading your book when it comes out.
 
David Richman
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Dobson <U63495@UICVM>
Date:           Friday, 11 Mar 94 17:21:47 CST
Subject: 5.0208  Imagining Gloriana
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0208  Imagining Gloriana
 
Many thanks to all who have contributed on this topic so far, especially
Phyllis Rackin, with whom we are in strong agreement: anyone wishing to
understand the full resonances of Louis Montrose on *Midsummer Night's Dream*
in the 1980s, for example, needs to read Robert Bly as much as Shakespeare! Luc
Borot needn't apologize for the apocryphal nature of the anecdotes he points
out -- the more apocryphal the better. It's what Elizabeth gets used to *mean*
rather than what 'really happened.'
 
So any further fantasies about Elizabeth are very welcome, so long as you
don't mind having us analyse them!  Any Simon Formans out there? Tell all --
 
Michael Dobson & Nicola Watson
 

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