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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: March ::
Re: Gloriana; PD Etexts; Oxford; Leontes' Disease
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0226.  Monday, 14 March 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Thomas G. Bishop <
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        Date:   Saturday, 12 Mar 94 17:12:37 -0500
        Subj:   Imagining Gloriana
 
(2)     From:   Tom Davey <IZZYOM8@UCLAMVS.BITNET>
        Date:   Sunday, 13 Mar 94 12:19 PST
        Subj:   SHK 5.0193  Public Domain Etext
 
(3)     From:   Pat Buckridge <
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        Date:   Monday, 14 Mar 1994 11:51:40 +1000 (EST)
        Subj:   Anti-antioxonianism
 
(4)     From:   Elizabeth Schmitt <E2E3SCHM@UNTVAX.BITNET>
        Date:   Sunday, 13 Mar 1994 23:06:27 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Leontes' disease
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Thomas G. Bishop <
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Date:           Saturday, 12 Mar 94 17:12:37 -0500
Subject:        Imagining Gloriana
 
Has anyone mentioned Donizetti's "Maria Stuarda" in response to this?
Gloriana comes off particularly poorly in that one, though she gets some
pretty ringing lines. It appears Jolly Robin Dudley was in love with Mary
Stuart along. Hell hath no fury like a Virgin Queen scorned! ("Io l'abborro!
Ei non fa che rammentarla!" Grrr!)
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Davey <IZZYOM8@UCLAMVS.BITNET>
Date:           Sunday, 13 Mar 94 12:19 PST
Subject: Public Domain Etext
Comment:        SHK 5.0193  Public Domain Etext
 
> . . . and we should like to release it in a more easy to use format.
 
If Michael Hart of Project Gutenberg is listening, may I make a suggestion for
the format?
 
I find the current Project Gutenberg Shakspeare difficult to use because the
whole canon is contained in one seamless text file of (if memory serves) over
1.5Mb in size. There are many word processors that cannot load a file of that
size; almost none can manipulate it efficiently. To use the Project Gutenberg
Shakespeare, then, requires one to manually break the huge file into chunks
beforehand--most tedious.
 
Why not assemble the etext canon by PKZIP-ping together 42 or so separate
files, one file for each play, poem, and the sonnets? We can UNZIP this file at
home and then easily access the text we need, each individual work taking less
than 200k.
 
> If, of course, your goal is to keep the Bard away from the masses, silence,
> which has been the previous response, would be totally appropriate.
 
The silence on this list in response to this message itself is indeed
interesting. I have a feeling there's some history here I don't know about.
 
In addition to his several more provocative claims, Michael Hart's message
raises juicy issues about public domain e-editions and their usefulness. I'd
love to post my thoughts, but I won't take up SHAKSPERean's time if the debate
is too contentious or already exhausted.
 
   Tom Davey
   UCLA (
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 )
 
[EDITOR'S NOTE: To try to head off any conspiracy theories, there is NO past
history here. The silence appears to me to be because NO SHAKSPERean has
answers to the questions that Michael Hart has raised.  SHAKSPER itself has NO
connection with any of the available Shakespeares on GOPHER, and I know of NO
SHAKSPEReans who have such connections.  There are four public domain texts
available on the SHAKSPER Fileserver (two versions of an early edition of my
transcription of the Q1609 SONNETS; an F1 *Henry VIII* and a Cornmarket
*Errors* both by Thomas Horton). I hope to announce soon how the SHAKSPER
Fileserver will be used to distribute public-domain, old-spelling, electronic
editions of the quartos and the First Folio, but those interested will have to
wait a little longer.  Finally, for the past two years, I have been preparing
an electronic edition for the public domain (even though I have been approached
by a commercial vendor) and am in NO way trying to keep Shakespeare from the
masses or anyone else. --HMC]
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Pat Buckridge <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 14 Mar 1994 11:51:40 +1000 (EST)
Subject:        Anti-antioxonianism
 
I'm a little puzzled.  Why is David Evett writing limericks against phantom
opponents?  As long as I've been part of this conference - only a  couple of
months, but I've read some back files - the only mention made of Edward De Vere
has been a forlorn request for information about a Boston debate, which was
never answered (or if it was I missed it). Is the 'Oxford theory'to be
understood as a sort of Manuel to the Basil Fawlty of Orthodoxy, always there
to be cuffed when you can't think of anything better to do?
 
Anyway, since the issue has been raised, could David remind me just what is the
overwhelming evidence that *King Lear* could not have been written and
performed before 1604?  In prose if possible. (Any other information on the
current state of play on the Shakespeare/Oxford front in North America would
also be appreciated, but perhaps David is not the person to ask for this!)
 
Patrick Buckridge
Brisbane, Australia.
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Elizabeth Schmitt <E2E3SCHM@UNTVAX.BITNET>
Date:           Sunday, 13 Mar 1994 23:06:27 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        Leontes' disease
 
In reponse to David Scott Wilson-Okamura's query about the disease that caused
Leontes' jealousy, I have found Patrick Stewart's response. Please be aware
that this was an interview that I did 12 years ago while on JYA. Listening to
my tape, I was very much in my "salad days" of scholarship. I had asked him if
he believed Leontes was merely paranoid. He replied that his research about the
character had led him to the conclusion that through Leontes Shakespeare is
chronicling" a specific kind of depressive illness. He didn't know about it; he
didn't have a name for it [note P.S. never gave me the name for it either]. A
very specific, detailed depressive illness that has a "fixed delusion
syndrome."One  branch of this kind of illness is suspicion of one's wife. It's
commonplace and it follows exactly the pattern  of Leontes. Absolutely the
same. Including, always, unless it's spotted, the person will always attempt to
murder the 'guilty' one...which Leontes does. Yes, he kills her. He doesn't
actually directly cause her death, but he is the reason for it. And  there
always follows a long, long, severe depression which  can last..16 years."
Patrick Stewart "discovered" this illness during his research of the charcter
which coincided with his just having played a consultant psychiatrist for the
previous 18 months. He also told me that his conclusions were confirmed at a WT
seminar which featured a Dr. Pardle (?) a consultant psychiatrist/ Shakespeare
scholar. Sorry I can't be more specific as to the order's name. Thanks for
giving me an excuse to listen to my interview tape again.{It's got great stuff
on his HIV, too.}
 
Elizabeth Schmitt
 

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