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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: March ::
Re: Videos; Welsh; Leontes; *Tempest*; P. Stewart
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0247.  Friday, 18 March 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Kenneth S. Rothwell <
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        Date:   Thursday, 17 Mar 1994 08:52:52 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0238 European Video Sources
 
(2)     From:   Terence Hawkes <
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        Date:   Thursday, 17 Mar 94 16:53 BST
        Subj:   RE: SHK 5.0241 Re: Welsh
 
(3)     From:   William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
        Date:   Thursday, 17 Mar 1994 11:53:04 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0237  Re: Leontes' Disease
 
(4)     From:   Ben Ross Schneider <SCHNEIDB@LAWRENCE.BITNET>
        Date:   Thursday, 17 Mar 1994 12:00:52 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   tempest & universals
 
(5)     From:   Elizabeth Schmitt <E2E3SCHM@UNTVAX.BITNET>
        Date:   Thursday, 17 Mar 1994 17:36:44 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   PSTEWART Clarification
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kenneth S. Rothwell <
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 >
Date:           Thursday, 17 Mar 1994 08:52:52 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0238 European Video Sources
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0238 European Video Sources
 
Dear Michael Skovmand, It's hard enough to keep up with domestice outlets
for Shakespeare videos without taking on the European market as well. I
suggest, however, that Kathy Grant's AS YOU LIKE IT (BUFVC: London, 1992)
offers some answers to your question. That failing, try inquiring directly
to the British Universities Film and Video Council, 55 Greek St., London,
WIV 5LR, England. Call 071-734-3687, or FAX 071-287 3914. Perhaps some
day somewhere there'll be a central office where this kind of information
can all be systematically assembled and kept up to date. Ken Rothwell
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <
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 >
Date:           Thursday, 17 Mar 94 16:53 BST
Subject: 5.0241 Re: Welsh
Comment:        RE: SHK 5.0241 Re: Welsh
 
Dear Christine Mack Gordon,
 
>>The friend who played Glendower got to the crucial place and simply said,
"Welsh, Welsh, Welsh," which--this being a fairly informal and lively
occasion--got a wonderful laugh from the audience<<
 
I bet. But perhaps your friend was wiser than he or she knew? The term *Welsh*
comes from the Old English *Waelisc* or *Wilisc*, which means *foreign* or,
more significantly, *not English* -a revealing name to attach to any nation and
one which perhaps tells us quite a lot about the project at stake in these
plays. Think of the similar denigration of French at the end of Henry V. Not
that there's anything *political* about all this, of course.
 
Your friend from foreign parts,
Cymru am Byth,
T. Hawkes
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
Date:           Thursday, 17 Mar 1994 11:53:04 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0237  Re: Leontes' Disease
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0237  Re: Leontes' Disease
 
Correction: I wanted to say that Leontes DOES have some reason for his
jealousy. Given the shame of cuckoldry and Leontes' perhaps elevated sense of
family honor, I don't have to use medical terms to account for his behavior. He
doesn't have to hunt for motives.
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ben Ross Schneider <SCHNEIDB@LAWRENCE.BITNET>
Date:           Thursday, 17 Mar 1994 12:00:52 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        tempest & universals
 
To Adrian Kiernander:  I defer to Joan Hartwig (17 March) who argues exactly as
I would.  Why is it so necessary that Prospero be a liar? Who has put these
disturbing ambiguities in the text?  Shakespeare? Tensions in early modern
England?  Postcolonial critics?
 
To James McKenna:  I agree that players will remove ambiguities by means of
business and characterization.  A mystified audience isn't going to be much
entertained.  I would add that Edmund's questionable deathbed reform is not
really analogous to Prospero's deliberate, willed reversal of behavior, in the
midst of his career, motivated by Ariel's revelation of his true character.
But Edm is a better person than the rest of the villainous gang in *Lear*:  he
deals plainly with himself; the others rationalize.  A forthright villain:
"Nature be thou my goddess."  Quite a likeable fellow when you get to know him.
Comparatively speaking.
 
Yours ever,
BEN SCHNEIDER

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(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Elizabeth Schmitt <E2E3SCHM@UNTVAX.BITNET>
Date:           Thursday, 17 Mar 1994 17:36:44 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        PSTEWART Clarification
 
Responding to Jimmy Carrillo and all who may have similarly gasped. When I
wrote HIV, I was referring to Henry IV. Patrick Stewart played the king in the
RSC production of Parts I and II that season. I suppose in this day and age one
needs now abbreviate the play as H4. So no rumours [which hath a 1000 tongues]
on this one. At last check he was healthy, no doubt wealthy, wise, and still as
talented as ever.
 
Elizabeth Schmitt
 
P.S.A recent catalogue [QPBC} advertised a video of Antony and Cleopatra
featuring Patrick Stewart. Any one seen this one?
 

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