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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: March ::
Re: Hey Nonny Nonny; A Frog; Welsh; Glorianna
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0252.  Sunday, 20 March 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Patricia Palermo <PPALERMO@DREW.BITNET>
        Date:   Saturday, 19 Mar 1994 17:50:37 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0248  Qs: Hey Nonny Nonny; A FROG . . .
 
(2)     From:   Joan Hartwig <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Saturday, 19 Mar 94 19:06:12 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0248  Qs: Hey Nonny Nonny; "A Frog . . ."
 
(3)     From:   Michael Dobson <U63495@UICVM>
        Date:   Saturday, 19 Mar 94 17:19:10 CST
        Subj:   Re: Videos; Welsh; Leontes; *Tempest*; P. Stewart
 
(4)     From:   Steve Urkowitz <SURCC@CUNYVM>
        Date:   Sunday, 20 Mar 94 00:07:16 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0244  Re: Imagining Gloriana
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Patricia Palermo <PPALERMO@DREW.BITNET>
Date:           Saturday, 19 Mar 1994 17:50:37 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 5.0248  Qs: Hey Nonny Nonny; A FROG . ..
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0248  Qs: Hey Nonny Nonny; A FROG . ..
 
In response to Edward Dotson's query about the meaning of "hey nonny nonny":
I always thought that such lines were simply nonsense syllables used to round
out song meter, rather like the "doo-wops" of the 1950's, or the Beatles' "yeah
yeah yeah's."
 
Anyone else?
Patricia Palermo
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joan Hartwig <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Saturday, 19 Mar 94 19:06:12 EST
Subject: 5.0248  Qs: Hey Nonny Nonny; "A Frog . . ."
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0248  Qs: Hey Nonny Nonny; "A Frog . . ."
 
To Edward Dotson: in English and Scottish Balladry, "hey, nonny, nonny" is
called a "nonsense phrase."  It isn't supposed to mean anything.
 
To Simon Morgan-Russell: the definitive essay on the frog/toad emblem and
its particular application to the suit of the Duc d'Alencon for Queen
Elizabeth's hand in marriage is by Doris Adler, "Imaginary Toads in Real
Gardens," ELR, 11 (1981): 238 and passim.  The terms "frog" and "toad" were
interchangeable during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.
 
Delighted you asked,
Joan Hartwig
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Dobson <U63495@UICVM>
Date:           Saturday, 19 Mar 94 17:19:10 CST
Subject:        Re: Videos; Welsh; Leontes; *Tempest*; P. Stewart
 
Further thanks to all those who have shown further evidence to our publisher of
the vast potential market for *Imagining Gloriana*, in which we solemnly
promise to reproduce everyone's favourite pin-ups of Glenda Jackson (the sort
of Gloriana one can *vote* for!), Bette Davis, Quentin Crisp, &c &c with the
most searching analytical captions yet seen -- a must for every cultural
materialist coffee table.
 
Meanwhile a last antiquarian note on the Welsh in HIVi -- although I stick to
my earlier guess that no British production of the Welsh scene would ever have
dared to try to fob off the punters with cod Welsh, it is perfectly true that
throughout the 18th century (expect for a few isolated productions) that part
of the scene was simply cut.  So was the rest of it, usually. The sort of
token Welshman the London stage could tolerate from Britain's National Poet was
Fluellen, the Max Boyce of the 1590s. Heigh ho.
 
        P.S. Rik Mayall
             Michael Pennington
 
                                         Michael Dobson
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steve Urkowitz <SURCC@CUNYVM>
Date:           Sunday, 20 Mar 94 00:07:16 EST
Subject: 5.0244  Re: Imagining Gloriana
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0244  Re: Imagining Gloriana
 
I can't remember the parameters of the "Imagining Gloriana" original request,
but I just remembered one of the madrigals from the celebratory publication of
pieces dedicated to the Queen: THE TRIUMPHS OF ORIANA.  Many, I think, or maybe
all, ended with the words, "Long live fair Oriana."  There's one particularly
wonderful piece from this collection in THE ELIZABETHAN SONGBOOK.  But I can't
find my copy, and I'm afraid I may even have the title of this modern songbook
wrong.
       As ever,
               Steve Urkowitz SURCC@CUNYVM
 

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