1994

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0255.  Monday, 21 March 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Kenneth Meaney <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 21 Mar 94 13:27:06 +0200
        Subj:   Re:  Hey Nonny Nonny
 
(2)     From:   Jerald Bangham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 20 Mar 1994 19:07:52
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0248  Qs: Hey Nonny Nonny; "A Frog . . ."
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kenneth Meaney <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 21 Mar 94 13:27:06 +0200
Subject:        Re:  Hey Nonny Nonny
 
'Hey nonny nonny', according to my Shorter Oxford Dictionary, is 'a
meaningless refrain, formerly often used to cover indelicate allusions'.  In
the song at the end of As You Like It, the refrain presumably refers to
whatever the "pretty country folks" (is there a pun here?) were up to in the
long grass.
 
Ken Meaney
University of Joensuu, Finland
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jerald Bangham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 20 Mar 1994 19:07:52
Subject: 5.0248  Qs: Hey Nonny Nonny; "A Frog . . ."
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0248  Qs: Hey Nonny Nonny; "A Frog . . ."
 
>Some time ago I was told that the English nickname for the French--"frog"--had
>its origin in a French suitor to Elizabeth,
 
I'd always assumed it was because the French ate frogs.
 
I believe that it was the Christmas before last that the British Museum had an
exhibit of cartoons showing racial stereotypes.  The British insulting the
French, the French the Germans, etc.
 
Anyway, the "frogs" in this show were the Dutch, since they lived in a swampy
land.  It was pointed out that the term was only later applied to the French.
 
Jerry Bangham
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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