Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: March ::
Re: A Few Good Men
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0262.  Wednesday, 23 March 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Patricia Palermo <PPALERMO@DREW.BITNET>
        Date:   Tuesday, 22 Mar 1994 10:40:24 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0257  Re: A Few Good Men
 
(2)     From:   James Schaefer <SCHAEFEJ@GUVAX.BITNET>
        Date:   Tuesday, 22 Mar 1994 12:57:26 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0257  Re: A Few Good Men
 
(3)     From:   John Drakakis <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 22 Mar 94 17:56:00 GMT
        Subj:   SHK 5.0256 Q: A Few Good Men
 
(4)     From:   Sean Lawrence <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 22 Mar 1994 19:43:11 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0256  Q: A Few Good Men
 
(5)     From:   Al Cacicedo <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 22 Mar 1994 22:02:28 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   RE: SHK 5.0257  Re: A Few Good Men
 
(6)     From:   Nick Clary <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 23 Mar 1994 08:48:25 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Good Men in Shakespeare
 
(7)     From:   Toni Brotons-Goodney <TBROTONS@MIAMIU>
        Date:   Wednesday, 23 Mar 94 10:10:50 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0256  Q: A Few Good Men
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Patricia Palermo <PPALERMO@DREW.BITNET>
Date:           Tuesday, 22 Mar 1994 10:40:24 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 5.0257  Re: A Few Good Men
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0257  Re: A Few Good Men
 
How about Adam and Corin, his green world counterpart, in _As you Like It_?
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James Schaefer <SCHAEFEJ@GUVAX.BITNET>
Date:           Tuesday, 22 Mar 1994 12:57:26 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0257  Re: A Few Good Men
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0257  Re: A Few Good Men
 
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern -- and you know what happened to them. Certainly
Orlando in *AYLI* is more sinned against than sinning. But, as others have
noted, the Devil is always more interesting than Everyman.
 
Samuel Johnson praised Shakespeare precisely because he captured "the real
state of sublunary nature," depicting our world as a "chaos of mingled purposes
and casualties."  It used to be a commonplace of criticism that the motivations
and emotions depicted in and evoked by Shakespeare's plays became ever more
mingled over his 20 years of writing for the stage, with the "dark comedies"
and "tragi-comedies" eventually taking over.  Genre-typing may seem a
superficial mode of criticism, but it does serve to point out a significant
shift in his choice of subject, character development, etc.  {Then there's
biographical criticism, but I'll let someone else carry the banner for Aging
Men....}
 
Jim Schaefer
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Drakakis <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 22 Mar 94 17:56:00 GMT
Subject: Q: A Few Good Men
Comment:        SHK 5.0256 Q: A Few Good Men
 
Try Horatio in *Hamlet*.
 
Cheers,
John Drakakis
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 22 Mar 1994 19:43:11 -0400
Subject: 5.0256  Q: A Few Good Men
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0256  Q: A Few Good Men
 
Hi, Blair.
 
I would immediately say that Horatio in *Hamlet*, and Tranio in *Taming of the
Shrew* are both "good men."  It all comes down, of course, to what we call
good.  I've seen it argued, convincingly, that Cordelia is a rather bad
person.  Why can't she just play along with her father's senile little game
and save everyone tragic misery?  Not that I'm saying she should, but maybe
our view of "good" women only results from lots of years of not very close
treatments of the female characters.  Almost all critics in the past were
men, after all.
 
Perhaps we should just look for a respectable moral sensibility, however
flawed and haphazardly applied, rather than "goodness."
 
        Cheers,
        Sean Lawrence.
 
(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Al Cacicedo <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 22 Mar 1994 22:02:28 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0257  Re: A Few Good Men
Comment:        RE: SHK 5.0257  Re: A Few Good Men
 
Several responses to the query about good guys in the plays included Horatio as
a possibility.  Am I the only one who sees a great deal of ambiguity in
Horatio's presence in Denmark?  What has he been doing at Elsinore for whatever
period of time he's there before his good soldier-buddies (a scholar *and*
soldiers' friend) bring him to Hamlet? How is it that he ends up being
Claudius' gofer?  I have many other questions about him.  Any other doubters?
 
Al Cacicedo (
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 )
Albright College
 
(6)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nick Clary <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 23 Mar 1994 08:48:25 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Good Men in Shakespeare
 
Perhaps I might suggest a few more characters for consideration as
Shakespearean good men.  After seeing AS YOU LIKE IT at St.Clement's last
month, I am more convinced than ever that Adam and Corin are pretty good men,
and I like to think of Orlando in similar terms.  Kent and Cornwall's servant
who dies in defense of Gloucester belong with Edgar on the list good guys in
KING LEAR, and I would certainly want to consider Gonzalo and Ferdinand in THE
TEMPEST.   It would also be difficult for me to exclude any of the Mechanicals
in DREAM, regardless of what might be said of their abilities as actors.
 
Surely others will find equally worthy candidates.  The Marine Corps, of
course, would have reasons to exempt a few.
 
The sun is shining over the Green Mountains this morning.  Temperatures are
predicted to hover in the 50's.  And yet if the cold and snows continue, I
will try to remember that
 
        Here feel we not the penalty of Adam,
        The seasons' difference, as the icy fang
        And churlish chiding of the winter's wind,
        Which when it bites and blows upon my body
        Even till I shrink with cold, I smile and say,
        "This is no flattery: these are counsellors
        That feelingly persuade me what I am."
        Sweet are the uses of adversity,
        Which like the toad, ungly and venomous,
        Wears yet a precious jewel in his head;
        And this our life, exempt from public haunt,
        Finds tongues in trees, books in the running brooks,
        Sermons in stones, and good in every thing.
 
Whoever said that, also belongs on the list.  Bernice Kliman and Hardin Aasand
will remember him from that afternoon at St. Clement's when a company of
talented players reminded us of spring on a Saturday in February when the
worlds from which we came still shivered through the winter season.  It was a
world on stage just as we liked it.
 
Nick Clary

 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
 
(7)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Toni Brotons-Goodney <TBROTONS@MIAMIU>
Date:           Wednesday, 23 Mar 94 10:10:50 EST
Subject: 5.0256  Q: A Few Good Men
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0256  Q: A Few Good Men
 
What about Edgar in *King Lear*?  Or even Kent for that matter?  How about
Escalus in *Measure for Measure*?  Even though he threatens the disguised
Duke, he doing so out of loyalty.  There's probably many more.
 
                                                      Toni Brotons-Goodney
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.