1994

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0265.  Friday, 25 March 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Naomi Conn Liebler <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 24 Mar 94 11:57:03 GMT
        Subj:   SHK 5.0262 Re: A Few Good Men
 
(2)     From:   Kenneth S. Rothwell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 24 Mar 1994 09:09:59 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0262 Re: A Few Good Men
 
(3)     From:   Lonnie J Durham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 24 Mar 1994 18:02:49 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Good and evil characters
 
(4)     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 24 Mar 1994 11:05:41 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0262  Re: A Few Good Men
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Naomi Conn Liebler <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 24 Mar 94 11:57:03 GMT
Subject: Re: A Few Good Men
Comment:        SHK 5.0262 Re: A Few Good Men
 
Depends, of course, on the definition of "good," as my old friend Aristotle
used to say. I've always thought--and think so still--that ALL the tragic
protagonists are GOOD men and women, even Macbeth who starts out as loyal
thane defending his king and his feudal structures against "that most disloyal
traitor / The Thane of Cawdor."
 
That's the trajectory of tragedy (you should pardon the alliteration): the
destruction of good guys.
 
Cheerfully,
Naomi Liebler
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kenneth S. Rothwell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 24 Mar 1994 09:09:59 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0262 Re: A Few Good Men
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0262 Re: A Few Good Men
 
Dear Everybody out there concerned about "good men" in Shakespeare's plays. My
problem is that I can hardly think of a single "good" man (or maybe woman too)
in the plays who isn't tinged with a shadow. Good, dear old Adam in AYL verges
on being an Uncle Tom; Horatio may be the last of the Romans but he's also
something of an enigma, maybe a little sneaky; Tranio is close to a buffoon;
Kent smacks of the "plain dealer" syndrome,  etc.  etc. Is this because I've
been repositioned in history, because the plays are some kind of a Rorschach
inkblot test, because I can't read, or because Shakespeare in his genius
created characters with real virtues and warts? I think it may be all of the
above but I favor the last theory. Ken Rothwell
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lonnie J Durham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 24 Mar 1994 18:02:49 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        Good and evil characters
 
As several contibutors to this topic have already suggested, the categories
"good" and "evil" may not be particularly relevant except on a superficial
level.  I am thinking especially about the cases of the Vice-Misrule types like
Diccon in *Gammer Gurton*.  He and his ilk work to stimulate (and ultimately to
purge) repressed animosities.  RIII is really this type rather than a tragic
hero; Hamlet is this _and_ a tragic hero. Tamburlaine is a cosmic example,
Feste a local, comic one. If to have a pharmacological function is "good," then
certainly all of these are good characters, despite appearances. No? Maybe?
Cheers to you all.  Thanks for the happy chatter.
 
Lonnie Durham  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 24 Mar 1994 11:05:41 -0400
Subject: 5.0262  Re: A Few Good Men
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0262  Re: A Few Good Men
 
The reason Horatio becomes Claudius' go-for is that Theobald added a stage
direction at 4.5.74.  Even if we accept this emendation, Horatio's co-option
doesn't make him a bad person, but shows how insidious the court drama is, in
being able to enslave *even* so good a person.
 
        Cheers,
        Sean Lawrence.

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