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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: March ::
Re: Horatio; Globe Address; Lenotes' Jealousy; Frogs
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0269.  Saturday, 26 March 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Christine Mack Gordon <
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        Date:   Friday, 25 Mar 1994 08:04:50 -0600
        Subj:   Horatio as a good man
 
(2)     From:   Harry Powell <
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        Date:   Friday, 25 Mar 94 11:04 GMT
        Subj:   New Globe Address
 
(3)     From:   William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
        Date:   Friday, 25 Mar 1994 21:25:57 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0264  Leontes' Jealousy
 
(4)     From:   William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
        Date:   Friday, 25 Mar 1994 21:44:27 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0258  Re: Frogs; Hey Nonny Nonny
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Mack Gordon <
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Date:           Friday, 25 Mar 1994 08:04:50 -0600
Subject:        Horatio as a good man
 
In response to Al Cacicedo's questions about Horatio: he is a character I've
been thinking/writing about for a very long time. I don't see the same
ambiguities that Al does, although I admit that they're interesting. I think
he's there because he truly care about Hamlet, but that he remains in the
background until Hamlet (or Shakespeare) needs him. As to his becoming
Claudius's go-fer, I don't see it. I think he's the eyes Hamlet leaves behind
at court when he's sent to England; I've always read his "looking after"
Ophelia as something he does as a result of either an explicit or implicit
request from Hamlet.
 
I disagree with Jim Schaefer about R & G, however; they're not good at all.
Naive, maybe. Impressed by power, certainly. Probably not evil. But certainly
not good.
 
Best wishes to all for a glorious spring!
Chris Gordon
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Powell <
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Date:           Friday, 25 Mar 94 11:04 GMT
Subject:        New Globe Address
 
Just so that anyone who wants to contribute can, this is the address that
I used;
 
Maxine Leonard
The Shakespeare Globe Trust
Bear Gardens
Bankside
Liberty of the Clink       (that's what it says on the letterhead...)
Southwark
London
United Kingdom
SE1 9EB
 
The address in the newspaper adverts was a little more concise;
 
Flagstone Appeal
Shakespeare Globe Trust
Bear Gardens
London
SE1 9EB
 
but I guess they are the same place. Just in case you don't know, you can
nominate a name to be inscribed on the flagstone you are funding...
 
Oh! Their telephone number is +44 71 928 7710
and fax........               +44 71 928 6330
 
Harry Powell
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
Date:           Friday, 25 Mar 1994 21:25:57 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0264  Leontes' Jealousy
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0264  Leontes' Jealousy
 
I think David Evett's experience and its relationship to Leontes is very
interesting and very informative. First, the experience suggests that we as
humans haven't changed much in the last 400 years. Second, it suggests that
 Leontes' experience of jealousy doesn't need to be "historicized" --
whatever that process may be.
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
Date:           Friday, 25 Mar 1994 21:44:27 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0258  Re: Frogs; Hey Nonny Nonny
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0258  Re: Frogs; Hey Nonny Nonny
 
I have only skimmed the great FROG controversy, but I did not notice a
reference to Farmer and Henley, SLANG AND ITS ANALOGUES, sv "Frog," 2:
"Formerly a Parisian; the shield of whose city bore three toads, while the
quaggy state of the streets gave point to a jest common at Versailles before
1791: Qu'en disent les grenouilles? i.e., What do the FROGS (the people of
Paris) say?" My apologies if this is old news, and I await Luc Borot's
commentary on this derivation.
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 

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