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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: March ::
Qs: Folio-Based Edition; Film Music; Othello Game
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0277.  Monday, 28 March 1994.
 
(1)     From:   William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
        Date:   Sunday, 27 Mar 1994 17:21:33 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   A student text based on the Folio?
 
(2)     From:   Ellen Edgerton <EBEDGERT@SUADMIN>
        Date:   Sunday, 27 Mar 1994 19:50 ET
        Subj:   Music and Shakespeare films
 
(3)     From:   Karla Walters <KWALTERS@UNMB.BITNET>
        Date:   Monday, 28 Mar 1994 06:35 MST
        Subj:   Othello Game
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
Date:           Sunday, 27 Mar 1994 17:21:33 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        A student text based on the Folio?
 
So, okay, the 18th century has definitely given us their text of Shakespeare's
plays and poems, and we have until recently accepted their gift with little or
no thought, or so it seems. Now, the scales have dropped from our eyes, and we
know the shadows from the true sun.
 
Nevertheless, the texts we teach from (e.g., Riverside, Bevington, Wells and
Taylor, Signet) are contaminated -- thoroughly contaminated -- by 18th century
editorial decisions. For example, look at Folio A&C, TLN 3108-3199 (V.i),
and compare the scene in the Folio with, say, the scene in Wells and Taylor
(4.6). Note the added stage directions, the changed speech headings, the
changed characters. The Folio's Menas (Pompey's former sidekick) is
conventionally changed to Maecenas -- without comment.
 
Is there a proposed new edition based on the Folio to remedy this perceived
problem? If not, why not?
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ellen Edgerton <EBEDGERT@SUADMIN>
Date:           Sunday, 27 Mar 1994 19:50 ET
Subject:        Music and Shakespeare films
 
Some time ago, I believe one of the members of SHAKSPER posted that they were
going to be writing something on the use of music in Shakespeare films.
Unfortunately, I can't for the life of me remember who it was.  If this is one
of you I'm talking about, please drop me an E-mail; I have a question or two to
ask you.  Thanks...
 
Ellen Edgerton
Syracuse University

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(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Karla Walters <KWALTERS@UNMB.BITNET>
Date:           Monday, 28 Mar 1994 06:35 MST
Subject:        Othello Game
 
One of my students has raised a question about the Othello board game (for
which a video version has been developed).  The question is, aside from the
possibility that the game is named for Madison Avenue reasons of marketability
(such as the word "Othello" sounds exotic or is easy to pronounce), is there a
logical connection of some kind between the game and Shakespeare's play?
 
The game consists of pieces which have one color on one side and another color
on the other side.  The idea is to fill as much of the board with your color.
If pieces are placed in certain ways next to other pieces, they become your
color, no matter their color before.
 
One logical connection between the game and the play is the idea that nothing
is ever as it seems.  Things change constantly.  Just because you have a
majority of your color on the board doesn't mean you are winning.  One move by
your opponent could change pieces into his color.  In the play, nothing is as
it seems to the characters, especially Othello.  He would see a scene as simple
as Cassio bragging about his sexual exploits with a prostitute and think his
former friend is bragging about taking his own wife.  He would look at his
honest friends and see only villainy, and look at the villainous Iago and see
an honest friend.  Possibly the game reflects this uncertainty about reality.
Any other suggestions?
 
Karla Walters  The University of New Mexico  
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