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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: March ::
Re: Othello Game; Editions; Ophelia's Contraceptive;
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0280.  Tuesday, 29 March 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Sarah Werner <
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        Date:   Monday, 28 Mar 1994 12:05:01 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: Othello Game
 
(2)     From:   Michael Young <
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        Date:   Monday, 28 Mar 1994 12:20:45 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0277  Folio-Based Editions
 
(3)     From:   Tad Davis <
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        Date:   Monday, 28 Mar 1994 13:38:24 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0278 Ophelia's Contraceptive
 
(4)     From:   Martin Zacks <lalalib%CLASS.ORG@Sdsc.BITnet>
        Date:   Monday, 28 Mar 1994 11:17:32 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Shakespeare in the MOOS
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sarah Werner <
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Date:           Monday, 28 Mar 1994 12:05:01 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Re: Othello Game
 
One of the crucial things about the Othello board game is that the pieces
are black and white--it's not just any colors that are changing but ones
that are specifically racially coded.  And that seems to me the logical
connection between the game and the play.  It's not a general uncertainty
about reality, but an uncertainty about race-- the board game is like the
play in that what's black and white is everything.  In fact, naming the
board game Othello seems a bit disturbing--what had been a game of logic
and spatial awareness became a bizarre game of racial contestation once I
realized the Shakespeare connection.  (And I only made the connection
after seeing a video version called Reverso with blue and red chips).
 
If your student--or you--is really interested in how they chose the name
Othello for the game, there's probably a good chance that if you write to
the company they might be able to track something down about it.
 
Sarah Werner
University of Pennsylvania
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Young <
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Date:           Monday, 28 Mar 1994 12:20:45 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0277  Folio-Based Editions
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0277  Folio-Based Editions
 
Dear Bill;
 
as an old student of yours (well, how are you doing?  Been so long....) at
UC, I remember you telling us that you had tried using the Norton copy of
the Folio as the textbook.  It had seemed to be more of a burden than a
boon.  Have you thought of a new tact?
 
Also, isn't all the editorial work done on the folio and Quatros part of
the story?  Could our undergraduates understand a nonedited text and
should our grad students not see the the trail/the history of the texts.
 
I do hope all is well.  Perhaps we'll get the chance to e-chat soon.
 
Yours,
Michael Young
Class of '89
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tad Davis <
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Date:           Monday, 28 Mar 1994 13:38:24 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0278 Ophelia's Contraceptive
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0278 Ophelia's Contraceptive
 
>         She addresses the Queen: "There's rue for you, and here's some
>         for me -- we may call it herb of grace o' Sundays.  Oh, you must wear
>         your rue with a difference."
 
It was always my impression, from reading and from viewing many performances,
that this is what happens. But the notes to the Oxford edition, edited by G. R.
Hibbard, relying heavily on the analysis in Jenkins' New Arden edition,
suggests something different:
 
- Laertes gets the rosemary for remembrance and pansies for thoughts.
- Gertrude gets the fennel ("for flatterers," according to other texts)
  and the columbine (symbol of willing cukolding).
- Claudius wears the rue with a difference, being the only character
  present who has tried to repent for anything.
 
There aren't any stage directions to indicate the author's intentions. This may
be one of those areas where the sense of rightness depends more on the director
and the actors than on literary analysis. (On the other hand, I've seen
productions where the director's sense of rightness included having the Ghost
wear a furred cap, since he "wore his beaver up.")
 
     Tad Davis
     
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(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Zacks <lalalib%CLASS.ORG@Sdsc.BITnet>
Date:           Monday, 28 Mar 1994 11:17:32 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Shakespeare in the MOOS
 
For those people not on the cutting edge of information technology, there
is an interesting (and fairly bizarre) article on MOO's and MUD's in the
March, 1994, issue of Wired. The article is by Josh Quittner and is entitled,
"Johnny Manhattan Meets the Furry Muckers." Not for the faint of heart.
 
Martin Zacks

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