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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: March ::
Qs: AYI Weather/Music; MLA Project Volunteer;
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0290.  Thursday, 31 March 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Robert S. COHEN <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Mar 1994 07:31:38 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   As You weather and music
 
(2)     From:   Milla Riggio <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Mar 1994 17:12:10 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Computerized Shakespeare and the MLA
 
(3)     From:   Michael Caulfield <
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        Date:   Thursday, 31 Mar 1994 01:58:59 -0500 (EST)|
        Subj:   Stylistics
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert S. COHEN <
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Date:           Wednesday, 30 Mar 1994 07:31:38 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        As You weather and music
 
Anybody have any thoughts about the weather conditions in the forest scenes of
AS YOU LIKE IT?  How much of the "icy fang And churlish chiding of the winter's
wind" does the exiled Duke and his pals actually face? I've seen Act II begin
in the snow, and in the summer, and even (in Munich once) in a steam bath for
the aged.  Any thoughts?
 
Also: anyone able to share with me some good contemporary scoring for the
songs?
 
Robert Cohen, UC Irvine Drama Department
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Milla Riggio <
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Date:           Wednesday, 30 Mar 1994 17:12:10 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Computerized Shakespeare and the MLA
 
Dear Fellow Shakesperians:
 
In the last stages of preparing a proposal - probably too long a proposal - for
the MLA, I find myself still in need of one gallant volunteer:  someone who
would be able to and would like to write a fairly brief introduction to a
section on computerizing the bard in the MLA volume on Teaching through
Performance:  this introduction would group the kinds of computer aids
available for those teaching Shakespeare; it would be accompanied by an
itemized check list of available computer materials (hypercard stacks and such
- none of which I understand yet, but which I'm sure I soon will).  The section
itself will highlight the in-progress MIT program, burt I need a good
introduction written by someone who knows what s/he is talking about to place
that in context.
 
Any takers?
 
Best,
Milla Riggio
[email me at 
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or 
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 ]
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Caulfield <
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Date:           Thursday, 31 Mar 1994 01:58:59 -0500 (EST)|
Subject:        Stylistics
 
During a recent discussion with a friend it was mentioned that "Wilt thou, upon
the high and giddy mast" (from Henry IV, 2) had an undeniable Shakespearian
sound. I thought that it might have to do with the modification: the way in
which the connotations of "giddy" seem to jar slightly against those of "high".
I would be interested to hear of any ideas on this, other examples in S., or
works which might help with this question.
 
Michael Caulfield
Merrimack, NH
 

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