Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: March ::
The Sonnets; Belott; Authors and Productions
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0293.  Thursday, 31 March 1994.
 
(1)From:                John Rhoades <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Mar 94 20:10:47 EST
Subject:        The Sonnets
 
(2)From:                Timothy Bowden <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Mar 94 15:53:35 PST
Subject:        Young Friend Belott
 
(3)From:                John Cox <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Mar 1994 15:01:07 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Authors and productions
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Rhoades <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Mar 94 20:10:47 EST
Subject:        The Sonnets
 
SHAKSPereans:
 
It seems that most of the discussion over the past few months has discussed
only the dramas, so under the category of something completely different, a
question for all of you.   In reading the sonnets, I was struck by how they
seem to function as a transition point between the Elizabethan sonnetteers and
seventeenth century poets such as Jonson and Herrick.  More specifically, it
seems that the absence (?) of a traditional sonnet woman and the absence of
stock sonnet machinery (especially war metaphors) paves the way for Jonson and
Herrick's poems portraying them as aging lovers.  I realize this is but the
sketchiest of arguments, but I would appreciate any feedback anyone could
offer.
 
Thanks in advance,
                  John Rhoades
                  Queen's University
                  
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Timothy Bowden <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Mar 94 15:53:35 PST
Subject:        Young Friend Belott
 
I believe, with the recent shifting in the dates of the sonnets to directly
overlap at least a portion of the Poet's stay with the Mountjoys, and given
especially the identical objectives expressed in both the early poems and the
depositions in the Belott suit, we can say with some certainty the early
sonnets grew out of an exercise Shakespeare devised to fulfill the mission
urged on him by Mrs Mountjoy:  pressing the young man to marry.
 
There is at least as much authority for this finding as there is for any other
identity of any of the principals sketched by the poet, indeed more than for
most of the legend generally accepted in some quarters;  the deer poaching, the
holding of the horses, the Mermaid matches of wits with Jonson.
 
There.  A controversial claim raises the question where a meek inquiry passes
unnoticed.
 
Thanks to those who have responded, and shall.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
For those who think that having Shakespeare present at a production of one of
his plays, the following is instructive.  It's a short article from *The
Manchester Guardian Weekly* of March 27, 1994 (p. 11):
 
    Trustees of the estate of the playwright Samuel Beckett are so angered
with the interpretation of one of his plays in a production running in
London that they have declared its director will never stage his plays
again.
    Deborah Warner's production of Beckett's 20-minute play, Footfalls,
opened last week at the Garrick Theatre in the West End with Fiona Shaw in
the leading role.
    Their crime in the eyes of the trustees was in failing to comply with the
exacting instructions which the playwright insisted in his will should be
followed to the letter in every production of his plays.
    "We have not done anything about the fact that she has not followed all the
stage directions.  Life is too short, but she will not be doing Beckett again,"
said Leah Schmidt, literary agent to the playwright's nephew and heir, Edward
Beckett.
    Ms Warner greeted news of the ban with anger.  "It is with deepest regret
that I heard this news and urgently ask them to reconsider this position," she
said. "Plays are fluid things not objects; they can exist only by being
reinter-preted for each generation."
    The dispute has cost Ms Warner the option to take the production to Paris.
    Earlier, the trustees raised concerns that five lines of text had been
transposed from one character to another.  Ms Warner apologised and returned
to the original.
 
John Cox
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.