1994

Q: Apparel

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0213.  Friday, 11 March 1994.
 
From:           Daniel Traister <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 10 Mar 1994 17:39:03 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Elizabethan Acts of Apparel and cases of conduct literature
 
[This posting originally appeared on RENAIS-L.  Please respond directly to
Theresa Sherman at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.]
 
Hi.  I'm a graduate student in History writing my thesis on the Elizabethan
Acts of Apparel (sumptuary laws).  One aspect of my thesis will discuss the
moral issues surrounding extravagent dress.  I was wondering if anyone had
any suggestions regarding sixteenth century cases of conduct literature that
deal with abuse of apparel that I should look at.  I've already read Phillip
Stubbes _Anatomie of Abuses_, something by William Averell and Charles Bansley
(the titles escape me at the moment), and William Harrison's _Description of
England_ (the section on the dress of the English).
        I know people on this list are a little touchy right now about simple
requests for information, but I am one of the few people at my university
studying this time period (the department has a mostly American West emphasis)
and I have very few resources for information to turn to.  Any help you could
give me would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks!
 
Theresa Sherman
Utah State University
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Job Announcement: English Department Head

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0212.  Friday, 11 March 1994.
 
From:           Search Committee <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 7 Mar 94 13:45:00 CDT
Subject:        Position Announcement - English Department Head
 
Please excuse the multiple posting if you receive more than one of
these postings.
---------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Position:  Associate or Full Professor of English and Head,
Department of English.  1994-1995 Academic Year.
 
Date of Appointment:  August 24, 1994
 
Salary:  $45,378 to $54,200 for nine months, plus attractive
University fringe benefits.  Full-time summer session assignment with
additional salary is normally provided for department heads at the
same rate of pay.
 
Responsibilities:  Provide direction and leadership and carry out
administrative responsibilities for a department of approximately 20
faulty members.  The department head normally assumes a one-half time
teaching load.  Administrative responsibilities include management of
departmental budgets, curricula, scheduling, and personnel, as well
as advising and other duties.
 
Qualifications:  Ph.D.  in English, credentials commensurate with
those of an associate or full professor.  Interest in innovative
teaching techniques, especially those using technological advances,
and in research.
 
Significant and effective experience in teaching on the university
level.  Relevent experience in administration and curriculum
development preferred.
 
The University:  Angelo State University, San Angelo, Texas, is a
highly-rated regional university.  The University is fully accredited
by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges
and Schools to award degrees at the associate, bachelor's, and
master's levels.
 
Apply to:  Dr.  E.  James Holland, Dean College of Liberal and Fine
Arts and Chairman of the Search Committee, Angelo State University,
San Angelo, TX 76909
 
Deadline:  Deadline is open but may be closed at any time after April
1, 1994.  Women and minority scholars are especially urged to apply.

MLA Teaching Through Performance

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0210.  Thursday, 10 March 1994.
 
From:           Milla Riggio <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 09 Mar 1994 15:28:35 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Re: [MLA Teaching Through Performance]
 
About the MLA Teaching Through Performance Book.  I am in the midst of
processing responses; it's terrifically exciting.  We've set some kind
of MLA record for responses overall and particularly for those wanting
to contribute essays to teh book.  This fact will force me to disappoint
some interested persons and it's slowing the process down a little,
since I'm trying to construct a book that will be genuinely useful but
not just a workbook.  I'm also going to propose to the MLA that the
book be accompanied by an MS-Dos diskette that will contain much of the
quite wonderful material that was submitted to me in the way of syllabi,
course descriptions, exercises, and so forth -- all completely acknowledged
by name and academic affiliation.  That in itself, if the MLA agrees, could
make the book really valuable to the teacher (and really give each of you
a copyright claim, if such is important, for your teaching exercises as
well as your essays).  All this is by of saying thank you in a preliminary
way and to tell you that each of you who responded can count on hearing
from me within the next few weeks about the shape of the book and the
fate of your contr4ibutions and suggestions.  Meanwhile, if you simply
want to know whether your response reached me and what its preliminary
status is, please write me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to ask.
 
Once more, thanks to all of you and to Hardy and the list for helping to
propel this project beautifully through its initial stage!
 
Best,
Milla Riggio
 
P.S. the diskette suggestion came from a member of the Lois Potter/Lena
Orlin Teaching Shakespeare through Performance Institute in which I
participated at the Folger Library all last year and twice this year.
Such collaborative suggestions are in the main what has made this
project so far take a shape that appears almost intelligible!  The
book itself grew out of this institute and will partly enshrine the
work we did there, but it has happily grown far beyond the limits
of its genesis.  Again, thanks!
 
--M.R.

Antioxonianism

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0211.  Friday, 11 March 1994.
 
From:           David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 9 Mar 94 17:41:19 EST
Subject:        antioxonianism
 
    The once was an earl named DeVere,
    Whose behavior was markedly queer.
       Although he was dead
       He got out of his bed
    And drafted a play called "King Lear."
 
                             Mordax Fife

Re: Welsh in *1H4*

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0209.  Thursday, 10 March 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Jean Peterson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 10 Mar 1994 11:11:17 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0204  Welsh in *1H4*
 
(2)     From:   Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 10 Mar 1994 11:29:58 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0204 Welsh in *1H4*
 
(3)     From:   John Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 10 Mar 1994 12:09:07 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0204  Welsh in *1H4*
 
(4)     From:   Michael Dobson <U63495@UICVM>
        Date:   Thursday, 10 Mar 94 11:29:05 CST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0204  Welsh in *1H4*
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jean Peterson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 10 Mar 1994 11:11:17 -0500
Subject: 5.0204  Welsh in *1H4*
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0204  Welsh in *1H4*
 
>What I wanted to ask (in my roundabout way) is, how has this scene
>been treated in recent productions, especially American ones, that
>SHAKSPEReans have either seen or acted in?  Is it cut entirely?  Altered
>in some way so that Glendower and Lady M don't have to actually speak
>Welsh?  Done with authentic Welsh?  If the latter, what do the characters
>say in their Welsh dialogue?  I'm curious about this.
 
Response to D.Kathman's question would be of interest to many of us, I'm
sure (it certainly is to me), and I would encourage that response be shared
via the network.
 
Jean Peterson
Bucknell University
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 10 Mar 1994 11:29:58 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0204 Welsh in *1H4*
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0204 Welsh in *1H4*
 
I believe the Shakespearean company that performed `The Wars of the
Roses' a few years ago (Michael Pendleton et al) did the Welsh scene in
Welsh.
 
Helen Ostovich
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 10 Mar 1994 12:09:07 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0204  Welsh in *1H4*
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0204  Welsh in *1H4*
 
I don't know what Dave Kathman means by "recent productions," but I saw a
*1 Henry IV* at Stratford Ontario in the early 60s in which the lady spoke
something I couldn't understand; I assume it was Welsh.  I saw the play again
at the Ashland, Oregon, Festival in 1988, and I don't remember what they did
which leads me to think that they may have cut the speech entirely.  You
might check the BBC (videotape) version as part of your sample as well.
 
John Cox
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Dobson <U63495@UICVM>
Date:           Thursday, 10 Mar 94 11:29:05 CST
Subject: 5.0204  Welsh in *1H4*
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0204  Welsh in *1H4*
 
English had only been made the official language of 'England' (ie. England &
Wales) under Henry VIII; in a way what is surprising is that the text of HIV
doesn't spell out the Welsh in the same way that HV spells out its French --
doubtless a reflection of the relative social status of the 2 languages. Even
before its big revival from the 1960s onwards, Welsh has always remained a
major living language in Britain, so I very much doubt whether there has ever
been  a native production of HIV that has risked trying to get by on completely
cod Welsh for that scene -- but I may be wrong, and would be interested to hear
of it.  I'd also be curious to learn how -- and indeed why -- this play gets
performed in the US; never mind how the Welsh sounds, what do they do with
words like 'Shrewsbury'?
                        Michael Dobson

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