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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: April ::
Re: AYI Weather; Stylistics; Deathbed Scenes; Hamlet
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0297.  Friday, 1 April 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Paul Silverman <
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        Date:   Thursday, 31 Mar 1994 11:33:22 -0800
        Subj:   AYI Weather/Music
 
(2)     From:   Chris Kendall <
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        Date:   Thursday, 31 Mar 1994 17:26:12 -0700 (MST)
        Subj:   Stylistics
 
(3)     From:   David Evett <R0870%
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        Date:   Thursday, 31 Mar 1994 16:08 ET
        Subj:   Deathbed Scenes
 
(4)     From:   Ellen Edgerton <EBEDGERT@SUADMIN>
        Date:   Friday, 01 Apr 1994 08:35 ET
        Subj:   Hamlet on Trial
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul Silverman <
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Date:           Thursday, 31 Mar 1994 11:33:22 -0800
Subject:        AYI Weather/Music
 
>Anybody have any thoughts about the weather conditions in the forest scenes of
>AS YOU LIKE IT? How much of the "icy fang And churlish chiding of the winter's
>wind" does the exiled Duke and his pals actually face? I've seen Act II begin
>in the snow, and in the summer, and even (in Munich once) in a steam bath for
>the aged.  Any thoughts?
 
I was involved in a production last sumer at the California Shakespeare
Festival that was set in 19th-century Russia.  The weather being nothing if
not inhospitable, the enthusiasm expressed by the Duke in Act II was not
shared by his crew.  Ironic reads of all these lines, and weary reactions
to the Duke's verve for comic effect.
 
And beautiful Russian folk scoring of the songs.
 
Paul Silverman
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Kendall <
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Date:           Thursday, 31 Mar 1994 17:26:12 -0700 (MST)
Subject:        Stylistics
 
"... the high and giddy mast"
 
Somewhere there's a glossary of figures of speech that I must get so that I
can identify subjects like the above and amaze and bore people at parties.
What's the name of this one, where a quality evinced in a human being by an
object is ascribed to the object itself?  I, too, find this trope
"Shakespearian" but can't say exactly why.  Possibly because he employed it
so frequently and with such startling economy.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <R0870%
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Date:           Thursday, 31 Mar 1994 16:08 ET
Subject:        Deathbed Scenes
 
In connection with an article-in-progress on deathbed scenes in Shakespeare
(of which a draft is on file with SHAKSPER), I would appreciate pointers to
scenes in non-Shakespearean early modern drama that represent people dying of
more or less natural causes (old age, disease).  You can email them to me
directly, 
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 , or by paper mail to Dept. of English, Cleveland
State University, Cleveland, OH 44115.  Thanks in advance.
 
                                                    Dave Evett
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ellen Edgerton <EBEDGERT@SUADMIN>
Date:           Friday, 01 Apr 1994 08:35 ET
Subject:        Hamlet on Trial
 
I noticed that this weekend, C-SPAN (of all networks) is going to be airing a
mock trial of Hamlet (for the murder of Polonius?), featuring one of the
Supreme Court justices and members of the White House legal staff doing the
cross-examining.  The first airing is on Saturday at around 10:00 am EST, and
I'm sure they'll repeat the program at some point during the weekend.
 
Check the listings; I just happened to notice this as I was reading TV GUIDE
just as I was leaving for work, so I didn't have time to write this information
down properly!
 
Ellen Edgerton
Syracuse University

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