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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: April ::
Re: Limericks; KJV; AYI Weather/Music; Macbeth &
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0310.  Tuesday, 5 April 1994.
 
(1)     From:   John Cox <
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        Date:   Monday, 04 Apr 1994 11:22:56 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   more limericks about Oxford
 
(2)     From:   Pat Dolan <
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        Date:   Monday, 04 Apr 1994 11:50:19 -0600 (MDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0300  Q: Shakespeare and the King James Bible
 
(3)     From:   David M Richman <
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        Date:   Monday, 4 Apr 1994 16:46:47 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0290 AYI Weather/Music
 
(4)     From:   Rick Jones <
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        Date:   Monday, 04 Apr 94 15:30:48 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0302  Re: Macbeth and Macduff
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Cox <
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Date:           Monday, 04 Apr 1994 11:22:56 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        more limericks about Oxford
 
Colleagues:
 
The recent limerick on Oxford inspired the following "limerick cycle" by an
eminent Shakespearean who is not on the network.  I include it for the
edification of all:
 
        Will Shakespeare to Oxford once said:
        "My lord, you've an excellent head
        For a tragical line.
        King Lear is quite fine
        For a chap who for years has been dead."
 
        There once was an earl named ol' Ox,
        Who allegedly got off his rocks
        By claiming to be
        William Shakespeare, e'en he
        Of the tragicall buskin and socks.
 
        There once was a gifted young poet
        Who, though born as an earl, didn't know it.
        He thought he was just
        William Shakespeare, and must
        Write some dramas in order to show it.
 
        The seventeenth earl of Oxford
        With his craft as a poet was bored.
        So he gave up his pen
        To Will Shakespeare, and then
        Paid him all that his purse could afford.
 
        O, what does it finally matter
        Who wrote all that fabulous chatter?
        Lord Oxford, the earl,
        Or some silly young girl,
        Or Shakespeare, as mad as a hatter?
 
John Cox
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Pat Dolan <
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Date:           Monday, 04 Apr 1994 11:50:19 -0600 (MDT)
Subject: 5.0300  Q: Shakespeare and the King James Bible
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0300  Q: Shakespeare and the King James Bible
 
There is a brief discussion about this, accompanied by an interesting, though
fanciful, speculation about the translation of the forty-sixth Psalm, in
Anthony Burgess' __Shakespeare__, pp. 233-234.
 
Pat Dolan
Arapahoe Community College

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(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David M Richman <
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Date:           Monday, 4 Apr 1994 16:46:47 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 5.0290 AYI Weather/Music
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0290 AYI Weather/Music
 
I have always understood AYL to begin in winter (perhaps midwinter spring, to
coin a phrase) and to move toward spring.  (Cliche, but that's comedy, right?)
I took the winter (icy fang) "counselors that feelingly persuade me what I am)
fairly seriously.  We didn't try to make artificial snow, but we did try with
gesture, stance etc. to take the cold into account.  The garments (we hoped)
were also wintry.  They changed, as did the lighting.  I have been less
satisfied with productions that don't try to do something about the winter in
Arden.
 
As to music, I like Cleo Laine's jazz versions.  There is also a very good
setting of "Blow Blow thou Winter Wind" by a Brazilian composer whose name
escapes me.
 
David Richman
University of New Hampshire
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Rick Jones <
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Date:           Monday, 04 Apr 94 15:30:48 EDT
Subject: 5.0302  Re: Macbeth and Macduff
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0302  Re: Macbeth and Macduff
 
It strikes me that the question of whether we can justify Macbeth in any terms
ties in to the "few good men" discussion of a week or so back.  To me, what
makes characters interesting in the theatre is precisely the fact that they are
neither totally "good" nor totally "bad".  Apart from the soul-searching
already mentioned, Macbeth is also clearly established as having been a brave
and loyal vassal for his entire life prior to the beginning of the play.  His
subsequent actions are not thereby excused, but neither do they completely
obliterate the "good" things Macbeth did.
 
A more archetypical case for me would be Iago.  I had always viewed him (and my
professors had always viewed him) as the incarnation of evil.  Probably because
of this interpretation, I found _Othello_ transcendently dull.  Then I saw a
production in which the character was played as a sort of displaced Restoration
rake: he does awful things to Othello because he can, because he is cleverer,
because, well, it's sorta fun to be naughty.  The production was otherwise only
so-so, but the *play* came alive for me for the first time. To anticipate Bill
Godshalk's question, no, I would not choose to live next door to Iago, Iagella,
and their brood of Iagettes... but they might be preferable to this one family
who lived next door to us about ten years ago...
 
Rick Jones

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