1994

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0320.  Friday, 8 April 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 6 Apr 1994 13:01:34 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0312 Q: A Dictionary of Shakespeare's Sexual Puns
 
(2)     From:   John Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 07 Apr 1994 08:35:22 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Limericks
 
(3)     From:   Kenneth S. Rothwell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 7 Apr 1994 09:16:46 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0317 Re: *MND* Productions; Stylistics; Dictionary
 
(4)     From:   Martin Zacks <lalalib%This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 6 Apr 1994 23:13:22 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re:SHK 5.0308 R: Theatre in Other Classrooms
 
(5)     From:   Ben Scheidner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 07 Apr 1994 13:28:16 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Plain Dealers
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 6 Apr 1994 13:01:34 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 5.0312 Q: A Dictionary of Shakespeare's Sexual Puns
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0312 Q: A Dictionary of Shakespeare's Sexual Puns
 
Frankie Rubinstein is a woman.  She has spent a lifetime investigating
obscenity in Shakespeare, but some of her assumptions do not work out when you
apply her definitions to the words in other contexts.  Try comparing what she
says to what Henke says in COURTESANS AND CUCKHOLDS (also out of print, but
available in some libraries -- he defines words in their contexts in
non-Shakespearean plays) and even to what Partridge says.  That should provide
enough guidance to tell you what to believe and what to discard.
 
By the way, what's the weather in Albuquerque?  It's snowing up here.
 
Helen Ostovich
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 07 Apr 1994 08:35:22 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Limericks
 
The limerick cycle I posted recently is not mine, as some have alleged.  It
was sent to me by David Bevington, whom I inadvertently failed to acknowledge
in my haste to publish it.
 
John Cox
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kenneth S. Rothwell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 7 Apr 1994 09:16:46 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 5.0317 Re: *MND* Productions; Stylistics; Dictionary
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0317 Re: *MND* Productions; Stylistics; Dictionary
 
I saw the 1992 MND at the National with the acrobat. She was absolutely
unforgettable, hanging upside down and inside out, or something, while
speaking her lines with aplomb. I can well understand how the poor young
woman injured herself as no human body was ever built to withstand such
shocks. The production opened to lukewarm reviews in the London press,
though I remain a closet admirer despite the "distractions from the
text." I'd already read the play before I got there. Ken Rothwell
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Zacks <lalalib%This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 6 Apr 1994 23:13:22 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: R: Theatre in Other Classrooms
Comment:        Re:SHK 5.0308 R: Theatre in Other Classrooms
 
As for Theater in Other Classrooms, and more specifically " humanist"
programming, I would recommend to James Schaefer (and Steve Urkowitz as well),
"Computers as Theater," by Brenda Laurel. Also, my computer-knowledgeable wife
recommends two books by Donald Knuth, "Art of Computer Programming," and
"Literate Programming."
 
If the Shakespeare Electronic Conference is an example, I think computers are
already "humanist."
 
Martin Zacks
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ben Scheidner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 07 Apr 1994 13:28:16 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        Plain Dealers
 
Thank you Douglas Bruster for the tip directing those interested in Plain
Dealing to Jean Howard's comments on the character Plain Dealing in Dekker's
*Whore of Babylon* in her new book on Social Struggle in Early Modern England.
I can't lay my hands on Jean Howard's book, but I did check out Dekker's play.
 
Dekker's Plain Dealing, along with Truth and Time, is a major ally of The Fairy
Queen (Elizabeth) in the defeat of the Whore of Babylon (Rome).  In this
context, Cornwall's derogation of the type in *Lear* puts him on the side of
the Whore of Babylon.  It is interesting that Dekker's Plain Dealing has an
invective style of speech similar to Kent's.
 
Yours ever,
BEN SCHNEIDER
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