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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: April ::
Qs: Imagery, Semantics; Friar Lawrence
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0321.  Friday, 8 April 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Michael Caulfield <
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        Date:   Thursday, 07 Apr 1994 01:33:12 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Imagery, Semantics
 
(2)     From:   Michael Dotson <
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        Date:   Thursday, 7 Apr 94 12:27:52 -0400
        Subj:   Friar Lawrence
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Caulfield <
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Date:           Thursday, 07 Apr 1994 01:33:12 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Imagery, Semantics
 
Does anyone know of any studies of imagery that have utilized current semantic
theory? It is my belief that the major force of imagery in Shakespeare comes
not from mental visualization (the "inner eye") but rather from a complex set
of intersections between the semantic entries of contiguous words. For
instance, the fairly nonimaginal quality of "truth" and "lies" is the result of
an "ordered" set of entries which finds similarity or opposition only along a
small, finite set of lines. On the other hand "star" vs. "wandering bark"
(Sonnet 116) becomes imaginal due to inherent haphazardness of entries in words
with physical referents. This is to say where truth vs. lies generated only
common opposition, star vs. wandering bark generates a plethora:
ethereal/material, fixed/moving, bright/dark, etc. (or, more properly
[+ethereal/-ethereal, +fixed/-fixed, etc.)
 
If anyone knows anything about semantic theory, modern approaches to imagery,
works which may elucidate this question or simply has feedback on the idea,
please respond.
 
Thanking you all in advance. . .
 
Michael Caulfield
Merrimack NH
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Dotson <
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Date:           Thursday, 7 Apr 94 12:27:52 -0400
Subject:        Friar Lawrence
 
Hi! I am currently doing an explication of Friar Lawrence's meditation
in Act II, Scene III. It is for an honors English 102 class. I have had
no previous experience with Shakespeare.
 
I am having some problems recognizing things like alliteration, assonance,
and consonance in the passage. I know it is a series of couplets, but that's
about as far as I could go with it. I think I have done a good job on
explaining the imagery. I was wondering if someone could either point me to
a good explication on this passage, or help me out a little here on the list.
Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks very much.
 
                        Mark Dotson <
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