Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: April ::
Qs: Teaching; Brook's *MND*; *Tro.*; Villains
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0334.  Wednesday, 13 April 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Bill Dynes <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, April  12, 1994
        Subj:   Teaching aids for the undergrad classroom
 
(2)     From:   Scott Crozier <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 13 Apr 1994 08:13:41 +1000
        Subj:   Brook's MND
 
(3)     From:   Alan Weber <BA07746%
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 12 Apr 1994 19:18 EST
        Subj:   Query
 
(4)     From:   Doug Cummins <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 13 Apr 1994 09:15:17 CST
        Subj:   Villains in Shakespeare
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Dynes <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, April 12, 1994
Subject:        Teaching aids for the undergrad classroom
 
I'm a new member of SHAKSPER, so I hope you'll forgive me if this subject has
been discussed more thoroughly in the past.  I'm wondering what teaching aids
others use to help students, primarily undergrads, *flesh out* and become more
comfortable with the plays, the era, and the like.  I use videos, of course,
and a small model of the Globe theater for discussions of the original playing
space.  What else is out there?
 
Dr. Bill Dynes
University of Indianapolis
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Crozier <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 13 Apr 1994 08:13:41 +1000
Subject:        Brook's MND
 
I'm interested in discovering from those who saw the production, whether the
plate that Brook used as a the little western flower actually made an audible
sound over the volume of the dialogue? I know of the freekas and the noise that
the metal trees would have made but did the flower made a sound?
 
Regards,
Scott Crozier
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Alan Weber <BA07746%
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 12 Apr 1994 19:18 EST
Subject:        Query
 
Dear Shake-fans,
 
Herzlichiu Gruzzen from Binghamton, NY, where the candle of Shakespeare burns
amid post-industrial depression.  I have been reading through some of the
medieval Troy stories which contain the Troilus and Cressida legend.  I came
across this curious line in a Mittelhochdeutsche poem
 
ez ist auch naturlich, daz ain yeglichiu fraw dez manns allzeit begert, reht
alz diu materi begert der form [it is also natural that every woman always
desires a man, just as material desires form]
 
The passage seems to be related to Guido delle Colonne (Historia Destructionis
Troiae)
 
Scimus enim mulieris animum semper virum appetere, sicut appetit materia semper
formam.  O utinam materia, transiens semel in formam posset dici suo contenta
formata!
 
I can't help but think that Shakespeare came across this passage in one of the
many European translations of Guido, and that a form/ material metaphor runs
explicitly throughout T&C, with Troilus as form and universal and Cressida as
world or material.  The idea of celestial male form and terrestrial female
material has a long history (Aristotle De Physica, Gnostics, Nichomachus,
Paracelsus in the Renaissance).  Has anyone uncovered any other metaphors in
T&C or other plays drawn from Scholastic, Stoic, or Renaissance physics?  I
know we're not supposed to think in dualistic terms in modern philosophy, mais
que sais-je?  I have been enjoying the Shaksper discussions.
 
                                -- von Weber
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Doug Cummins <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 13 Apr 1994 09:15:17 CST
Subject:        Villains in Shakespeare
 
Good Morning!  I am working with an undergraduate student on a research paper
comparing various Shakespearian "villains", namely Iago, Richard III, and
Claudius.  The paper is prompted by the fact that he is playing Claudius in our
current production of Hamlet, which I am directing.  He has done a fine job, so
far, but we've both reached a kind of dead end in finding material that
compares the characters.  We especially need more information on Claudius.
There's a lot of stuff on Richard and Iago, as you might expect, but old
Claudius is overshadowed by his Danish step-son. I am primarily a director and
and actor, and although I revere the works of WS and perform them regularly,
I'm not up on all the current research on the Bard.  If you know of some
sources or have some information that Kirk could use in his paper, please send
them out on the wire,or mail them to me privately at dcummins@panam. Kirk and I
will be  very grateful.
 
In the meantime, we open Hamlet on April 27.  We'll appreciate all the good
vibes,wishes, prayers and incantations you can send our way.
 
"Remember me . . ." Doug Cummins, The University of Texas - Pan American,
Edinburg TX
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.