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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: April ::
Re: Mousetrap; Plain Dealing; Teaching; *MND*
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0337.  Saturday, 16 April 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Ron Moyers <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 13 Apr 1994 14:58:00 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Mousetrap
 
(2)     From:   Christine Mack Gordon <
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        Date:   Thursday, 14 Apr 1994 10:04:11 -0500
        Subj:   plain dealing
 
(3)     From:   E. L. Epstein <epstein@QCVAXA.BITNET>
        Date:   Thursday, 14 Apr 1994 23:04:21 EDT
        Subj:   RE: SHK 5.0335  Re: Plain Dealing
 
(4)     From:   Karla Walters <KWALTERS@UNMB.BITNET>
        Date:   Thursday, 14 Apr 1994 00:18 MST
        Subj:   Ideas for Teaching Shakespeare
 
(5)     From:   Clifford Ronan <
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        Date:   Thursday, 14 Apr 94 00:57:10 EST
        Subj:   Re: Woman as matter, man as form
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ron Moyers <
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Date:           Wednesday, 13 Apr 1994 14:58:00 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        Mousetrap
 
Rick Jones and Bill Godshalk properly note that Claudius' reaction to a play
depicting a nephew murdering an uncle-king is open to various interpretations.
Additional ambiguity in the script comes with Horatio's rather flat answers
to Hamlet's questions after the King's departure: certainly Horatio must be
acted as clearly agreeing or disagreeing with Hamlet or as confused by the
events (and presumably such a clear choice was made under the author's
tutelage), but the text offers no clarification of Horatio's view.  In my
experience, Hamlet's planning, expectation, and reaction tend to influence
an audience into seeing any reaction by Claudius as guilty, but my 20th-
century eyes see Claudius as being in greater control of his public persona,
and I think an ambiguous or an "innocent" response from him is more interesting
dramatically than an obviously guilty reaction.--Ron Moyer, Theatre, Univ. of
South Dakota
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Mack Gordon <
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Date:           Thursday, 14 Apr 1994 10:04:11 -0500
Subject:        plain dealing
 
Thanks to Ben Schneider for seeking clarification about my earlier comment. I
would agree that in most cases plain dealing is a good thing; I certainly like
plain dealing villains more than double dealing ones-- something about clarity,
I suppose. But I've also seen (occasionally) plain dealing used as a weapon by
real and fictional people, and then the waters do become a bit more muddy. I
tend to be straightforward to a fault myself, which can lead to trouble in some
situations, but I think that in most cases it's the best option. But I'd hate
to lose the double-dealers in life and literature, however, since they too have
a certain appeal. Greetings to those in Albuquerque, and I hope everyone else
is having as lovely a day as we are here in Minnesota today. --Chris Gordon
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           E. L. Epstein <epstein@QCVAXA.BITNET>
Date:           Thursday, 14 Apr 1994 23:04:21 EDT
Subject: 5.0335  Re: Plain Dealing
Comment:        RE: SHK 5.0335  Re: Plain Dealing
 
Let's be sure that we can distinguish between a plain dealer and a railer. In
fact, isn't the point made explicitly in *Lear*? ELEpstein
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Karla Walters <KWALTERS@UNMB.BITNET>
Date:           Thursday, 14 Apr 1994 00:18 MST
Subject:        Ideas for Teaching Shakespeare
 
This is a response to the request for ideas besides videos and models of the
Globe theater to make Shakespeare come to life for teenage students.  The April
1993 issue of _English Journal_ was devoted to ideas for teaching Shakespeare.
The National Council of Teachers of English has just published a book by James
E. Davis titled _Teaching Shakespeare Today: Practical Approaches and
Productive Strategies_ (1993).
 
At the SAA conference here in Albuquerque, Peggy O'Brien of the Folger
Shakespeare Library gave a presentation on teaching Shakespeare to high school
teachers that was very exciting and got everyone involved.  She initiated us
all into Shakespeare's language by having us do choral readings, antiphonal
readings, successive readings and directing of scenes.  It was fun, lively, and
dramatic and would work wonderfully with high school students.
 
A new book Peggy O'Brien mentioned, that incorporates both scholarship and
teaching ideas generated at the Folger is _Shakespeare Set Free_.
 
I hope this is helpful.  I'd also be interested in some further discussion of
teaching strategies for Shakespeare on this list.
 
Karla Walters
Univ. of New Mexico    
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[Editor's Note:  We SHAKSPERians have Karla Walters to thank for enabling
me to edit your submissions from Albuquerque.  Thank you Karla.  --HMC]
 
(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Clifford Ronan <
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Date:           Thursday, 14 Apr 94 00:57:10 EST
Subject:        Re: Woman as matter, man as form
 
To: Alan Weber
 
I suppose you will get many replies quoting *MND* I.1, where Theseus over
(?)states the patriarchal tradition descending from the Greeks (cf. Athena
in the *Oresteia*) as he tries to scare her into submitting to
her father's will:
 
To you your father should be as a god;
One that compos'd your beauties; yea, and one
To whom you are but as a form in wax
By him imprinted, and within his power
To leave the figure, or disfigure it.
 
With every hearty wish from charming Krakow,
      Cliff Ronan, Southwest Texas SU/ U of Silesia
 

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