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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: May ::
Re: Hypermedia; Lights; *Mac.* Ancedote; OTA
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0382.  Sunday, 1 May 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Michael Cohen <
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        Date:   Friday, 29 Apr 1994 09:38:44 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0379 Re: Hypermedia
 
(2)     From:   John Boni <
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        Date:   Friday, 29 Apr 1994 13:34:30 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0378 Qs: Othello's Lights
 
(3)     From:   Ellen Edgerton <EBEDGERT@SUADMIN>
        Date:   Friday, 29 Apr 1994 19:58 ET
        Subj:   Yet another *Macbeth* anecdote
 
(4)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Friday, 29 Apr 1994 21:13:03 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Thanks for the Address, and Contra Oxfordians
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Cohen <
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Date:           Friday, 29 Apr 1994 09:38:44 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 5.0379 Re: Hypermedia
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0379 Re: Hypermedia
 
In response to Diana Akers Rhoads' query: HyperCard is a computer program sold
by Apple Computer.  Among other things, it is used to create hypertext and
hypermedia presentations.
 
Hypertext and hypermedia (sometimes called "multimedia" though there are those
who would say that synonym is WRONG) are both terms used to describe methods of
presenting of text (or in the latter case, text, graphics, video, and sound) on
the computer screen, such that readers can move from topic to topic in a
dynamic way. It is hard to describe without actually demonstrating, and, like
so much else, one person's definition becomes another person's fighting words
(so please don't flame me, you hypermultimedia mavens out there), but here's a
simple example: you could design a Shakespeare hypermedia presentation so that
on the screen you have the text of Shakespeare's Macbeth. Clicking (with the
mouse) on a line of text brings up a video performance of the line. Clicking on
a word that is marked (say, with an underline) brings up a definition. Clicking
on a little text symbol (like a miniature page) on the bottom of the screen
brings up a another window containing commentary about the scene.
 
I don't want to clog up the list with more examples, but if the example above
doesn't suffice, contact me and I'll go into more detail.
 
As for Don Weingust's query about fair use: as I understand it, you can pretty
much use anything as long as it is for YOUR classroom use only, you do not
charge admission, you do not distribute it, you do not sell it, and you
purchased the original source material. That is, it is just as though you
bought a book and read it to your class. If you photocopied the library's book,
you are violating the law. If the copy was stolen, you are violating the law.
If you charge admission to your reading, you are violating the law. I am not a
lawyer, so don't quote me on this--Nimmer on copyright is the standard legal
source on the topic, and his multivolume tome goes into great detail on
electronic publishing issues. When in doubt, get the rights (hey--would you
want YOUR work to be incorporated into a multimedia work without your
permission?).
 
As for the costs of rights--it varies WIDELY, and there are few guidelines,
since all the recent media hype about multimedia and the information
superhighway makes some people think that the property that was a bomb at the
box-office will be a hit in multimedia, and outrageous fees are the order of
the day (this year--next year the bubble may burst).
 
Michael E. Cohen
a.k.a. 
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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Boni <
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Date:           Friday, 29 Apr 1994 13:34:30 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 5.0378 Qs: Othello's Lights
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0378 Qs: Othello's Lights
 
RE: "Put out the light."  The syntax helps me decide Othello's meaning. He
refers first to the candle he is (usually) holding, and mentions that he can
relight (relume) that.  But the greater act (and loss) is that of putting out
the light of Desdemona which cannot be relit.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ellen Edgerton <EBEDGERT@SUADMIN>
Date:           Friday, 29 Apr 1994 19:58 ET
Subject:        Yet another *Macbeth* anecdote
 
For the person who inquired about *Macbeth* anecdotes, here's a doozy that just
happened the other day:  a jogger was attacked at Northwest Missouri State
University by a naked former RSC member who was to play Lady Macbeth in a local
production of the play on Wednesday. The actress (who according to witnesses
seemed high on...well, >something<, and was not wearing a stitch) allegedly
propositioned the victim's husband (who was jogging with her at the time), then
clawed and scratched the victim, drawing blood.  It took three men to subdue
the actress.  This was reported in the St. Joseph (Mo.) News-Press on Thursday
(the attack took place on Tuesday).
 
The university's public relations officer confirmed that an understudy was set
to replace the actress.  "The show must go on..."
 
I dunno...this certainly is one of the "best" ones I've heard for quite a
while.  In such a rapidly changing world, it's nice to know that some things
never change:  the sun will rise, the tides will flow, and there will always be
disastrous productions of *Macbeth*.  I feel strangely comforted.  (I think.)
 
Ellen Edgerton
Syracuse University
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Friday, 29 Apr 1994 21:13:03 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Thanks for the Address, and Contra Oxfordians
 
Thank you very much to all who have responded. You have been very, very
generous, and now I must sort through the material. I apologize to those whom I
have not addressed personally.
 
Concerning the Oxfordian controversy, I can hardly be generous. Charles Ogburn
wrote me a nasty little note, accusing of intellectual dishonesty and so on.
Now, I can not defend myself against these charges since I have all the humans
failings (including intellectual dishonesty), but it is not very politic of
Ogburn to draw these  failings to my attention, especially if he wishes to draw
me to his cause. So I say, "Have at thee, Ogburn."
 
Bad Billy (and NOT Sweet William)
 

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