Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: May ::
Re: New Shakespearean Knowledge
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0409.  Sunday, 8 May 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Melissa Aaron <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Saturday, 7 May 1994 08:40:12 +0200
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0400 Re: New Shakespearean Knowledge
 
(2)     From:   David Scott Wilson-Okamura <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Saturday, 7 May 94 10:40:49 CDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0406 Re: New Shakespearean Knowledge
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Melissa Aaron <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Saturday, 7 May 1994 08:40:12 +0200
Subject: 5.0400 Re: New Shakespearean Knowledge
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0400 Re: New Shakespearean Knowledge
 
I'm surprised that no one, in this pro-and-con over whether or not to make fun
of *students*, have noticed that much of the point of Ron Dwelle's satire is
*our own* dogged search for academic minutiae.  Surely some of the humor lies
in finding a "ur-text" in an unexpected location, much like PDQ Bach
manuscripts being found in a coffee filter (I refer, of course, to the "Sanka
Cantata.") Of course, that would require us all to possess a sense of humor
about ourselves. . .:-
 
        Melissa Aaron
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Scott Wilson-Okamura <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Saturday, 7 May 94 10:40:49 CDT
Subject: 5.0406 Re: New Shakespearean Knowledge
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0406 Re: New Shakespearean Knowledge
 
Just a note on teaching conditions in American public schools: large class
size is not necessarily a deficit.  In Japan, at present the most literate
nation on the planet, high school class size usually hovers somewhere between
40 and 50 students per.  I'm not suggesting that Japan has it all together--I
for one would hate to be a Japanese high school student--and there are a lot
of factors in Japanese society that make for a high literacy rate, not least
of which are the many hours most people in that country spend on the train
every day.  On the other hand, big classes don't seem to be hurting much.
 
                        Just proffering a little-known fact,
                                                David Wilson-Okamura
                                                
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.