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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: May ::
Re: Lady Anne; *H6*; MIT/Stanford; Polonius; Masks;
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0415.  Monday, 9 May 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Martin Mueller <
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        Date:   Sunday, 8 May 1994 10:10:39 -0500
        Subj:   Lady Ann and New Shakespearean Knowledge
 
(2)     From:   Luc Borot <
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        Date:   Sunday, 8 May 1994 17:24:31 +0100
        Subj:   T. Hands' Henry VI
 
(3)     From:   Stephen Orgel <
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        Date:   Sunday, 8 May 1994 10:26:51 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0407  Qs: MIT/Stanford Project
 
(4)     From:   Marc W. Kuester <
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        Date:   Monday, 9 May 1994 11:44:53 +0200 (MESZ)
        Subj:   Masks in Timon of Athens
 
(5)     From:   William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
        Date:   Sunday, 08 May 1994 21:16:46 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   KING JOHN bibliography
 
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Mueller <
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Date:           Sunday, 8 May 1994 10:10:39 -0500
Subject:        Lady Ann and New Shakespearean Knowledge
 
The argument  that "the seduction scene with Lady Anne takes place over a
casket holding the body of her murdered husband (?!?)" may be a blooper in some
ways, but in another way it says something about the deep structure of the
scene. Somewhere not so far in the background of the seduction scene (and very
plausibly part of Shakespeare's literary memory) is the Matron of Ephesus
tradition with its many, and frequently coarse, descendants as for instance the
version by Marie de France in which a man sees a widow grieving over the body
of her husband and making a bet with his companion that he can "get" her (the
French is cruder)
 
Martin Mueller
Northwestern University

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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Luc Borot <
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Date:           Sunday, 8 May 1994 17:24:31 +0100
Subject:        T. Hands' Henry VI
 
Dear all,
 
Louise Nichols <
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 > asks for a written account of
Terry Hands's 1977 production of the 3 parts of H6. There is a review by
Jean-Marie Maguin (and several pictures) in *Cahiers Elisabethains* 12 (Oct.
77) pp.77-80. Some of the pictures show the king and Margaret in a close
relationship. I let you read Maguin's review to know more about what he thinks
about what it was like. I was too young to be there.
 
Hope this helps.
 
Luc Borot
<
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 >
Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches Elisabethaines
Universite Paul Valery
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephen Orgel <
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 >
Date:           Sunday, 8 May 1994 10:26:51 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 5.0407  Qs: MIT/Stanford Project;
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0407  Qs: MIT/Stanford Project;
 
In reply to Robert Knapp on the Stanford/MIT project: Larry Friedlander's email
address is 
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 , and you could get an update from him
directly.
 
Re: Polonius, I'm really baffled by all the sarcasm, but nobody has suggested
that Polonius is satirizing Pullen, only that it was a name to be avoided when
performing the play at Oxford, as Reynaldo was too close to Rainoldes. Clearly
plausibility is in the eye of the beholder; no surprises there.
 
S. Orgel
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marc W. Kuester <
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Date:           Monday, 9 May 1994 11:44:53 +0200 (MESZ)
Subject:        Masks in Timon of Athens
 
Dear Shakspereans,
 
Concerning the question on masks in Shakespeare performances: Only once have I
ever seen the employment of masks for the whole cast, but then to amazing
effect: The performance of Timon of Athens in Bochum/Germany. It used intensive
doubling, though this was not the main reason for this strategy. The masks were
huge - some times the size of a human head - and highly stylized. The
intriguing thing about them was their reaction towards light: through the
position of their heads and through lighting shadows created all sorts of
faces, laughing, crying... It was wonderful to see this, but it requires much
skill to produce the masks this way and to handle them accordingly.
Nevertheless, I could not picture the strict use of masks in many of
Shakespeare's other plays (Romeo's face hidden - a nightmare).
 
On the other hand I could see but a few days ago a performance of Richard II.
by the famous Bremer Shakespeare Company. As they frequently do they played
with a very small cast - four players in this case - but with only fairly
limited cuts in the required personnel - apart from attendants, lords and
Isabel everyone was present. Most of the changes took place right on stage and
were achieved by simple means, namely by putting on a new coat or the like.
They did this so skillfully that even those who did not know the play could
follow it without difficulty and enjoyed it very much. The only danger was a
certain drift towards caricature and simplification of the minor characters,
but I did not find this too irritating.
 
Regards,          Marc W. Kuester
 
(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
Date:           Sunday, 08 May 1994 21:16:46 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        KING JOHN bibliography
 
John Knight and others interested in KJ may not yet know that Deborah T.
Curren-Aquino's KING JOHN: AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY (New York: Garland, 1994),
is now available. It's almost 900 pages plus a 27 page introduction. It's a
must for KJ scholars, and, no, I'm not disinterested. (I'm general editor of
the series.)
 

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