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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: May ::
"The stately legate"; "English" Translation
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0416.  Monday, 9 May 1994.
 
(1)     From:   William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
        Date:   Sunday, 08 May 1994 21:37:38 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   "The stately legate of the Persian King"
 
(2)     From:   Tom Loughlin <
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 >
        Date:   Sunday, 8 May 1994 22:28:30 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   The "English" Version
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
Date:           Sunday, 08 May 1994 21:37:38 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        "The stately legate of the Persian King"
 
This afternoon, reading THE TAMING OF A SHREW, I hesitated over the lines: "As
was the Massie Robe that late adornd/The stately legate of the Persian King"
(Bullough, NARRATIVE AND DRAMATIC SOURCES, vol. 1, 85 [Scene 7, lines 46-47] or
in the F. S. Boas edition II.i.131-2). Boas notes the Marlovian echoes of 1
TAMBURLAINE III.i.43-4, and 2 TAMBURLAINE III.ii.123-4.
 
But are these lines a reference to an historical event? I seen to have
something in the back of mind about eastern visitors to Elizabeth's court, but
I couldn't find the reference in my home library -- if indeed there is one. But
if there is, such a reference, were it definite, would give a terminal date for
A SHREW. Has this reference been identified?
 
Yours,  Bill Godshalk
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Loughlin <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Sunday, 8 May 1994 22:28:30 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        The "English" Version
 
While following the thread on the "Ur-text" of Hamlet, my wife happened to come
home this past Friday with an interesting tale.  She works part-time in a local
adult learning center which doubles as a detention hall for misbehaving high
school students.  She monitors them as they complete their homework.  This past
Friday she happened to be helping a student with his English homework, which
centered on Romeo and Juliet.  She offered to get down a version of the play
from the small library shelf at the center, but was quickly informed by Jose
that they were studying the "English version" of the play.  A quick check of
their English textbook revealed a version of R&J written in modern, colloquial
English - the "English version."  Granted, Jose is not the brightest of
students, but this text cuts across the entire grade in the curriculum, so
everybody at our local high school has the great good fortune to study
Shakespeare's R&J in "translation."
 

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