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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: May ::
Re: RSC Women's Group; Mannerism in *Ham.*; Masking
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0446.  Friday, 20 May 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Ron Moyers <
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        Date:   Thursday, 19 May 1994 13:01:20 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   RSC Women's Group
 
(2)     From:   John Dorenkamp <
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        Date:   Thursday, 19 May 1994 16:19:05 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   "Mannerism in Shakespeare" (Hamlet)
 
(3)     From:   Scott Crozier <
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        Date:   Friday, 20 May 1994 07:33:24 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0443  Re: Masking Shakespeare
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ron Moyers <
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Date:           Thursday, 19 May 1994 13:01:20 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        RSC Women's Group
 
In the April 1989 issue of *Plays International*, p. 8, Christine Eccles
interviews Juliet Stevenson, Paola Dionisotti, and Anna Furse regarding
their production of *On the Verge* at the Lilian Baylis Theatre, Sadler's
Wells (for which Stevenson had negotiated a hiatus in her Hedda performances
at the National).  Introducing the interview, Eccles writes: "The three
women all had something to do with the Women's Project at the RSC which
culminated in the 1986 production of Deborah Levy's play *Heresies*."
That is the only mention of the WP in the article, but the brief interview,
along with Carol Rutter's *Clamorous Voices: Shakespeare's Women Today*
(interview/discussions with Sinead Cusack, Dionisotti, Fiona Shaw, Stevenson,
and Harriet Walter) might help fill in attitudinal/philosophical background.
 
--Ron Moyer, Theatre, University of South Dakota  <
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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Dorenkamp <
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Date:           Thursday, 19 May 1994 16:19:05 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        "Mannerism in Shakespeare" (Hamlet)
 
Lawrence Guntner might be interested in Helen Whall's "Hamlet and the
Manner of the Miniature" in the current issue of Interfaces: Image, Texte,
Langage, 1994, number 5, pp. 295-315, published by the Universite de
Bourgogne.  Originally delivered at the Word and Image conference in
Nice last summer, the article discusses both English resistance to Mannerism
(as represented in Hilliard's treatise on the miniature) and Shakespeare's
Mannerist response in Hamlet.
 
If you have difficulty obtaining a copy, let me know at the address below
and I will send you a copy.
 
John Dorenkamp (
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(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Crozier <
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Date:           Friday, 20 May 1994 07:33:24 +1000
Subject: 5.0443  Re: Masking Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0443  Re: Masking Shakespeare
 
Just a comment about masking in MND. Although Bottom is translated and appears
with a asses's head, the fairies refer to him as a "mortal".  Does this mean
that his mask would have allowed a good proportion of his face to be seen or
does it mean that in other respects he remained mortal although translated?
 
Regards,
Scott Crozier
 

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