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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: May ::
Re: Videos; Summer; Memorizing; Adriana's Speech
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0461.  Thursday, 26 May 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Christine M Gordon <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 25 May 1994 20:39:26 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Videos & Summer
 
(2)     From:   Steve Urkowitz <SURCC@CUNYVM>
        Date:   Thursday, 26 May 94 07:11:11 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0456  Qs: Video Recommendations
 
(3)     From:   William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
        Date:   Wednesday, 25 May 1994 22:38:41 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: Adriana II.i.110-115
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine M Gordon <
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Date:           Wednesday, 25 May 1994 20:39:26 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        Videos & Summer
 
I haven't seen the entire *Antony & Cleopatra* with Dalton and Redgrave, but
the clip I saw was absolutely dreadful; I don't think I'd spend $70 on it.
 
Apologies to Scott Crozier and our other colleagues south of the equator; there
I go, being hemispherist again. I'm delighted you'll be around to talk about
whoever this guy is who wrote these plays (and poems).
 
A moderately frivolous query: does anyone else out there enjoy memorizing
sonnets and passages from the plays? I find this a delightful occupation in
those otherwise tedious moments of the day (standing on the bus stop or in a
line, walking the dog, etc.). When I teach, I insist that everyone memorize at
least one passage from a play we're studying: while there's usually some
resistance at the beginning, most students ultimately enjoy it. I always liked
memorizing (poems especially) as a child and teenager, but have only come back
to it recently as an adult (and I'm glad I have). It's one very interesting way
of coming to terms with a text.
 
May your summer days be pleasant, your winter ones invigorating.
 
Chris in Minnesota (where we KNOW about winter, and cherish our summer days)
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steve Urkowitz <SURCC@CUNYVM>
Date:           Thursday, 26 May 94 07:11:11 EDT
Subject: 5.0456  Qs: Video Recommendations
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0456  Qs: Video Recommendations
 
The Lynn Redgrave ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA video, like most of the overpriced Bard
productions made me feel like my brain was being filled with tepid plastic.  I
saw only the first ten minutes before my brain shorted out.  But the new
release of Janet Suzman's performance (with Patrick Stewart as Enobarbus)
crackles with all kinds of energy.  Actually, the A&C with Charlton Heston has
many fine moments, particularly the meeting between Antony and Caesar.  It
might be fun to show parallel clips of passages from any of these versions as
exercises in multiple visions.   But we textual scholars seem to think that
sort of thing is fun.  Go know.
 
The Suzman video is now available for about $20.
 
                                                    G'luck.
                                                    Steve Urkowitz
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <GODSHAWL@UCBEH>
Date:           Wednesday, 25 May 1994 22:38:41 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Re: Adriana II.i.110-115
 
For John Senczuk,
 
I assume that the hard part of the speech begins with line 110 (Riverside
edition). Gold will always ("still") endure the touch of others. There's a pun
on "touch" which is used in the ordinary sense and in the sense of "checking
the quality of." I take the "and" of line 111 to have the force of "but." And I
will (hesitantly) accept the emendation of "Where" to "Wear" in line 112. "But
repeated 'touching' [both senses] will wear even gold." Even gold will begin to
tarnish if you rub it enough. The "and" of line 112 I read as "and even more
than gold." "No man who has a reputation will defame it [the reputation] by
lying and corrupt behavior."
 
Compare the following passages: III.i.86, and 100ff; IV.i.71-84
(reputation/shame).
 
Obviously, this is a tough passage to read. But Adriana seems to be comparing
gold with reputation, the promised chain with Antipholus's martial promise,
coinage with Antipholus. She sees Antipholus as gold abiding "others touch."
 
But at line 114, Adriana seems to include herself in the "loss" of beauty
(109-110).
 
That's about all I have to say about the passage right now. If we're lucky,
someone will disagree, and we'll get a heated discussion going. Let's hope that
the discussion generates more light than heat!
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 

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