1994

Mid-Atlantic Shakespeare Weekend

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0460.  Thursday, 26 May 1994.
 
From:           Mike Field <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 25 May 1994 13:51:35 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        An Invitation to Mid-Atlantic Shakespeare Groups
 
The Maryland Renaissance Festival--Maryland's largest outdoor themed
entertainment--is again sponsoring a "Shakespeare Weekend" during the long
Labor Day weekend, Sept. 3, 4 & 5. In addition to the regularly scheduled
productions of [abridged] R & J and Shrew, as well as thrice-daily appearances
of "Shakespeare's Skum" [fractured-fairy tale versions of the Bard] the Fair
hopes to highlight as many other Shakespeare performing groups, societies,
scholars and etc... as possible.
 
Last year's successful weekend featured performances by actors from
Washington's Shakespeare Theater and Maryland's Shakespeare on Wheels as well
as an appearance of Mr. Shakespeare himself. This year we are hoping to do
more.
 
The outdoor event is informal and flexible, and could accomodate performances,
demonstrations, lectures, discussion groups and more, including, possibly, use
of the Fair's to-scale reproduction of the stage of the Globe. We will also
happily distribute any flyers, brochures or other information your group might
have. Daily attendance (barring rain) exceeds 12,000 and frequently approaches
20,000.
 
For more information please call entertainment director Carolyn Spedden at
1-800-296-7304; e-mail to Mike Field at the above address, or write Carolyn at:
Md. Ren. Fest.; P.O. Box 315; Crownsville, Md. 21032.
 
Thank you. Hope to see you there.

Re: Endymion; Discussion Groups; Globe Site

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0459.  Thursday, 26 May 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Milla Riggio <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 25 May 1994 12:29:29 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0455  [Endymion]
 
(2)     From:   John Boni <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 25 May 1994 13:19:11 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0455 [Nature of Discussion Groups]
 
(3)     From:   Edna Boris <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 25 May 94 19:11:03 EDT
        Subj:   [Globe Site]
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Milla Riggio <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 25 May 1994 12:29:29 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0455  [Endymion]
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0455  [Endymion]
 
This is really for Rick Jones, and it's just a note about Endymion.  David
Bevington has just finished working on this play and is satisfied that he,
at last, has "cracked" the allegorical nut.  I'm not sure when this will
be published.  But stay tuned.
 
Best,
Milla Riggio
 
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From:           John Boni <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 25 May 1994 13:19:11 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 5.0455 [Nature of Discussion Groups]
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0455 [Nature of Discussion Groups]
 
I applaud the editor's decision that the "authorship" question has for now run
its course, though I must admit that I learned a good deal of interesting
information in the process.
 
However, this raises for me a larger issue of the nature and purpose of groups
such as this.  I have participated in several such discussion groups and remain
active in two.  We at times engage in topics fairly close to trivia, at other
times, we touch upon major and weighty issues. Perhaps this pattern constitutes
a defense of refereed publication. I am by no means suggesting that we initiate
refereeing internet communication.
 
Another thought presents itself: perhaps without the protection of print and
copyright, some persons are hesitant to share their ideas for fear of the ideas
being ripped off by a net member?
 
More than musing, speculation.
 
John M. Boni
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
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From:           Edna Boris <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 25 May 94 19:11:03 EDT
Subject:        [Globe Site]
 
Nicholas Robins, museum manager at the Bankside Globe restoration has provided
the following information which may interest others.  Tours of the Globe site
are by appointment only but can be arranged with a couple of days' warning.
The museum is open 7 days a week and costs 3 pounds; the hours are 10:00 a.m.
to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 2:00 to 5:30 on Sunday.

Re: SAA Meeting; Student Gaffs; Summer

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0457.  Wednesday, 25 May 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 24 May 1994 11:47:49 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0449 Q: 1995 SAA Meeting
 
(2)     From:   Timothy Dayne Pinnow <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 24 May 1994 17:37:59 -0500
        Subj:   Student Gaffs
 
(3)     From:   Scott Crozier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 25 May 1994 18:19:49 +1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0454  Summer
 
 
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From:           Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 24 May 1994 11:47:49 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 5.0449 Q: 1995 SAA Meeting
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0449 Q: 1995 SAA Meeting
 
It is my understanding that the World Shakespeare meeting will be in Los
Angeles in August 1995, and that the SAA regular meeting will be in Chicago in
March.
 
Helen Ostovich
 
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From:           Timothy Dayne Pinnow <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 24 May 1994 17:37:59 -0500
Subject:        Student Gaffs
 
Dear Shakespereans--
 
I hesitate to pass along one more nugget of information to be found in grading
student papers, but this one simply must be shared.  While grading the essay
portion of my intro to theatre exams, I ran across--
 
"One of the most important things in Greek comedy was that all the men wore
fallacies."
 
My wife suggested to me that I may have uncovered a universal truth.
 
                                                 Timothy Dayne Pinnow
                                                 St. Olaf College
                                                 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
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From:           Scott Crozier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 25 May 1994 18:19:49 +1000
Subject: 5.0454  Summer
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0454  Summer
 
Please spare a thought to all of us south of the Equator who are avid
conference members. We are entering into deep winter! So if you are not on
gloriuos holidays, there are people out here still wanting to  discuss the
works of Shakespeare (aka)!!!
 
Regards,
Scott Crozier (in winter woollies!)

Qs: Late Romances; Curses and Cursing

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0458.  Thursday, 26 May 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Patricia Buchanan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 25 May 1994 12:46:21 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   [Late Romances]
 
(2)     From:   Matthew Westcott Smith <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 25 May 1994 17:23:34 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Curses and Cursing
 
 
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From:           Patricia Buchanan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 25 May 1994 12:46:21 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        [Late Romances]
 
I am working on Shakespeare's late romances (specifically Pericles, Cymbeline,
Winter's Tale, and Tempest) and would be grateful for any suggstions on two
separate research issues.
 
1. I am interested the motif of abandonment that appears in these four plays,
especially children abandoned by fathers.  Can anyone suggest where this motif
appears outside Shakespeare?  I'm new to this; has this topic been done to
death?
 
2.  I'd also like to look at what the old historical critics did in light of
new historicism.  Any suggstions?
                                        Patricia Buchanan
                                        English Department
                                        Salem State College
                                        This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
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From:           Matthew Westcott Smith <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 25 May 1994 17:23:34 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Curses and Cursing
 
I am currently working on a book length treatment of *Richard III*, which
includes a discussion of the problem of the women's curses, and cursing more
generally.  In this regard, I would appreciate any comments on the following
items:
 
[1] To my knowledge, no other play in the corpus contains so many prominent
curses and references to curses. I must admit that, not having read the
_entire_ corpus, that I wonder if I might be missing something. Does anyone
know of other prominent treatments in the corpus, particularly those involving
women?
 
[2] I am also looking for suggestions on sources that might have treated the
problem of cursing in general, and in the corpus.
 
Thanks in advance,
 
Matthew Westcott Smith
Dept of Political Science
SUNY at Buffalo

Qs: Video Recommendations; Adriana's 2.1 Speech;

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0456.  Wednesday, 25 May 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Elise Earthman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 24 May 1994 08:59:39 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re:  Video Recommendations
 
(2)     From:   John Senczuk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 25 May 1994 07:02:54 +1100
        Subj:   Adriana, COMEDY OF ERRORS
 
(3)     From:   Patrizia Ardemagni <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 24 May 94 23:18:34 CEST
        Subj:   Thesis on Salvini
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Elise Earthman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 24 May 1994 08:59:39 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Re:  Video Recommendations
 
Can anyone recommend a good video production of The Tempest that's easily
acquired?  We have the BBC in our library, but I'm wondering if some of you
might like another production better.  Also, can anyone tell me about the
production of Antony & Cleopatra with Timothy Dalton and Lynn Redgrave, which
I've seen advertised in several catalogues--I'm intrigued, but since it's
somewhere around $70, I'd like a recommendation before I buy--
 
Thanks,
Elise Earthman
 
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From:           John Senczuk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 25 May 1994 07:02:54 +1100
Subject:        Adriana, COMEDY OF ERRORS
 
The following passage, I know, is notorious ... I have a good actress playing
the role and, strangely, in performance have found a 'meaning' in terms of the
action, but I'm anxious to speculate as to the exact meaning of the following
passages:
 
ADRIANA.
Unfeeling fools can with such wrongs dispense;
I know his eye doth homage otherwhere,
Or else what lets it but he would be here?
Sister, you know he promis'd me a chain;
Would that alone a toy he would detain,
So he would keep fair quarter with his bed:
I see the jewel best enammelled
Will lose his beauty; yet the gold bodes still
That others touch, and often touching will
Wear gold, and no man that hath a name
By falsehood and corruption doth it shame.
Since that my beauty cannot please his eye,
I'll weep what's left away and weeping die.
                 2.1.103-116 [ARDEN]
 
ADRIANA.
Unfeeling fools can with such wrongs dinspense:
I know his eye doth homage otherewhere,
Or else, what lets it but he would be here?
Sister, you know he promis'd me a chain,
Would that alone, a toy he would detain,
So he would keep fair quarter with his bed:
I see the jewel best enamelled
Will lose his beauty.  Yet the gold bides still
That others touch, and often touching will,
Where gold and no man that hath a name,
By falsehood and corruption doth it shame:
Since that my beauty cannot please his eye,
I'll weep (what's left away) and weeping die.
             2.1  [FOLIO]
 
It is not only the punctuation but Theobald's emendation of wear/where which
poses most problem for me.
 
My maiden posting, ladies and gentlemen.  Be gentle.
 
John
 
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From:           Patrizia Ardemagni <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 24 May 94 23:18:34 CEST
Subject:        Thesis on Salvini
 
I am an Italian student at the State University of Milan. I am writing a thesis
on the great Italian actor Tommaso Salvini (1826-1919) and his Shakespearian
interpretations of Macbeth, Othello, Hamlet, King Lear and Coriolanus.He was
very succesfull in his tours all over the world and above all in  the United
States and UK. I am looking for all the bibliographic materials, articles and
any possible recordings (cassettes or bobbins) of his performances. Since
Salvini couldn't speak English and acted in Italian it would be very
interesting for me to know the response of the audience to his performances
abroad, I mean  I'd like to read any articles written by the critics of that
period. I have been already kindly assisted by Cornelia Wallin curator of the
Williams / Watson Theatre Collection in Hanover, NH. I know this is a  very
individual request and I don't want to clutter Shakpser. If anyone has any
information about my  bibliographic research I would be very grateful for
e-mailing directly to me. Thank you in advance for all your help.
 
Patrizia Ardemagni
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