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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: December ::
Qs: World View; Cardenio; Stratford; Female Frienships
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0980.  Tuesday, 6 December 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Paul Silverman <
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        Date:   Sunday, 4 Dec 1994 18:00:48 -0800
        Subj:   Elizabethan Point of View
 
(2)     From:   Timothy Reed <
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        Date:   Monday, 5 Dec 1994 12:16:02 -0700
        Subj:   Cardenio reprise
 
(3)     From:   Eric Grischkat <
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        Date:   Monday, 5 Dec 1994 11:36:58 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: Stratford Festival auditions
 
(4)     From:   Helen Ostovich <
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        Date:   Monday, 5 Dec 1994 12:22:29 +0001 (EST)
        Subj:   [Female Friendships]
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul Silverman <
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Date:           Sunday, 4 Dec 1994 18:00:48 -0800
Subject:        Elizabethan Point of View
 
Can somebody point me to some resources on the Elizabethan world view as
applied to Shakespeare's plays, i.e. how a period Elizabethan would have
seen, interpreted and reacted to the plays based on the beliefs, values and
assumptions of the times?  I'm not looking for overviews of Elizabethan
beliefs, but more specific play-by-play discussions.  Any recommendations?
 
Paul Silverman

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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Timothy Reed <
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Date:           Monday, 5 Dec 1994 12:16:02 -0700
Subject:        Cardenio reprise
 
Searching through the archives of last year, I came across the brief discussion
 of Charles Hamilton's book claiming that "The Second Maiden's Tragedy" was, in
fact,  Shakespeare and Fletcher's "Cardenio."
 
I was intrigued by some of Mr. Hamilton's arguments based on the handwriting of
 the SMT manuscript versus that of Shakespeare's will. Some of them seemed weak
arguments, but I  have no basis to disagree with his ability as a handwriting
expert. I found his arguments on  style to be sparce and vague, and his
arguments about source material to be somewhat contrived.
 
As a new subscriber to this list I may be dredging up tired material on the
subject, but I didn't find any material in the archives later than July of last
year, and I would like  to know
 
1) Are any papers or publications available that detail similarities and
differences between "The Second Maiden's Tragedy" and Shakespeare's later works
based on textual style?
 
2) I'd like to hear personal opinions from anyone who has read "The Second
Maiden's Tragedy." A friend whose knowledge of Shakespeare is considerable
swears that Act I must be  Shakespeare; while my wife, a playwright, is
positive that Shakespeare had nothing to do with it.
 
While the authorship argument might seem useless and pedantic to some, it does
serve an actual function in this case. "The Second Maiden's Tragedy" is a
likely candidate for  our theatre company's 1995-96 season. The problem is not
one of whether we would choose to  include the play based on authorship
(personally I think it is a splendid play that deserves more  recognition), but
how to advertise the play, should we choose to include it. Our audiences have
come to trust the fidelity of our scholarship regarding textual accuracy, and
we would feel  uncomfortable advertising it as a Shakespearean play if there
was reasonable evidence that Hamilton was  another in the continuing stream of
self-deluded Shakespearean "scholars" who twist any  available scrap of
evidence to fit their pet theory.
 
Timothy Reed
(
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(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Eric Grischkat <
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Date:           Monday, 5 Dec 1994 11:36:58 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Re: Stratford Festival auditions
 
Does anyone on the list have information regarding the Stratford Ontario
auditions?
 
egg
Eric George Grischkat
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Helen Ostovich <
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Date:           Monday, 5 Dec 1994 12:22:29 +0001 (EST)
Subject:        [Female Friendships]
 
I am working on plays of the early Caroline period that deal with female
friendships, particularly friendship between a lady and her maid or secretary.
Does anyone know of any books or articles that touch on the subject of female
friendship in the late Renaissance?  References to plays dealing with
cross-class friendships would also be appreciated.
 
Helen Ostovich
McMaster University

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