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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: December ::
Re: Shakespeare's Voices; The Second Maiden's Tragedy
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0988. Wednesday, 7 December 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Harry Hill <HILHAR@CONU2.BITNET>
        Date:   Tuesday, 06 Dec 1994 16:07:46 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0981  Re: Images and Clips
 
(2)     From:   John Lavagnino <
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 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 6 Dec 1994 23:31 EDT
        Subj:   Re: The Second Maiden's Tragedy
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Hill <HILHAR@CONU2.BITNET>
Date:           Tuesday, 06 Dec 1994 16:07:46 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0981  Re: Images and Clips
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0981  Re: Images and Clips
 
        Shakespeare's Voices on CD
 
For listeners with an auditory imagination and the time to linger in front of
their loudspeakers, the CD *Great Shakespeareans", produced by Pearl in the UK,
is a particular pleasure. It shows the range in acting styles from Edwin Booth
and Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree through Arthur Bourchier, Lewis Waller, Ben Greet
and Sir Johnston Forbes-Robertson to Sir John Gieldgud, Henry Ainley and
Maurice Evans.
 
Arthur Bourchier's `Dagger' speech is a revelation, an object lesson to any
actor in its vocally physical response to the words within the lines.  In his
"Come, let me clutch thee", there is a visible, tantalizngly intangible dagger
in the air, and Macbeth's desperate ambition indicated by the rich explosion of
the "tch" of "clutch" is  made corporeally possible but spiritually precarious
by the softening "thee". I had never heard of his performance until I bought
this compact disc and I am tempted to transcribe his reading in the same sort
of way that Joshua Steele recorded Garrick's Hamlet, but leave it to the
readers of SHAKSPER to give the disc as a revelatory Christmas present to
friends who share delight in the phonic representation of emotional realities.
 
      Harry Hill
      Concordia University
      Montreal
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Lavagnino <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 6 Dec 1994 23:31 EDT
Subject:        Re: The Second Maiden's Tragedy
 
The Second Maiden's Tragedy is presented as the work of Middleton alone in the
edition of Middleton's works that sixty-three other scholars and I are
currently finishing up for publication by Oxford University Press. That view
has also been the general consensus for the last fifty years; we haven't found
anything in Hamilton's work to make us change our mind.
 
You can find a good discussion of the attribution question in Anne Lancashire's
excellent edition of the play in the Revels series (1978). The books by David
J. Lake and MacD. P. Jackson on Middleton attribution appeared after she
finished her edition, but they don't substantially change the picture that she
describes, except to add further evidence for the attribution to Middleton.
 
And whoever wrote it, it certainly is a wonderful play.
 
John Lavagnino, Brandeis University
 

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