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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: December ::
Qs: Role of Fate in *Rom.*; Early Modern Women Writers
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No.1006. Wednesday, 14 December 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Rose McManus <
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        Date:   Monday, 12 Dec 1994 22:19:13 -0800
        Subj:   Romeo, Juliet, fate, and.....
 
(2)     From:   David Schalkwyk <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 13 Dec 94 11:04:29 SAST-2
        Subj:   Women writers
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Rose McManus <
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Date:           Monday, 12 Dec 1994 22:19:13 -0800
Subject:        Romeo, Juliet, fate, and.....
 
A hospice counselor by profession, a Shakespeare junkie for the life and
passion of his words, I've silently monitored this list for 2 years. This first
posting was prompted by a recent raging discussion in my small reading group.
Usually, we read the plays aloud, make brilliant, illuminating observations,
and retire, feeling well fed.  Last week a lively, and occasionally heated
exchange focused on the role of fate vs. cultural and historic contexts in
producing the bittersweet outcome of Romeo & Juliet.
 
The reading I've done over the years suggests that this may be a tired topic
for scholars.  Still, I'd love to receive thoughtful comments on the matter
from any interested parties.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Schalkwyk <
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Date:           Tuesday, 13 Dec 94 11:04:29 SAST-2
Subject:        Women writers
 
Our students have expressed an interest in courses on women writers in the
early modern period and our library has very little material in this area.
Could I ask members of the list to let me have some suggestions about a good
basic collection and reading list?  Thanks.
 
David Schalkwyk
 

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