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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: December ::
Re: *Pericles*; *Mac* on CD-ROM; Fate in *Rom*
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 1012.  Monday, 19 December 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Charles Adler <
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        Date:   Saturday, 17 Dec 1994 19:40:12 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0960  *Pericles*
 
(2)     From:   Bradley S. Berens <
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        Date:   Sunday, 18 Dec 1994 16:26:37 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0995 Re: *Macbeth* on CD-ROM
 
(3)     From:   Steve Urkowitz <SURCC@CUNYVM>
        Date:   Sunday, 18 Dec 94 20:45:24 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.1006  Role of Fate in *Rom.*
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Charles Adler <
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Date:           Saturday, 17 Dec 1994 19:40:12 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0960  *Pericles*
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0960  *Pericles*
 
Two or three years ago the Public Theater (then, under Joseph Papp) in New York
did a very good presentation of Pericles as part of the Marathon which will
*eventually* include all thirty-six.  At the same time and in conjunction with
the Public, the New School for Social Research, also in NYC, had a three
session course on Pericles, the last consisting of a discusion with the show's
dramaturg.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bradley S. Berens <
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Date:           Sunday, 18 Dec 1994 16:26:37 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 5.0995 Re: *Macbeth* on CD-ROM
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0995 Re: *Macbeth* on CD-ROM
 
Greetings All!
 
Regarding the MACBETH CD-ROM, Matt Henerson asked me to correct him if I had
not, as he suggested, seen it at Cody's in Berkeley.
 
I did not see it at Cody's but bought it directly from Voyager.
 
This is the third of three Shakespeare CD-ROMS that I have had contact with.
The first is a simple text of the plays from CMC Research. Moderately useful,
but since there are no textual variations, the utility is severely limited.
 
ROM #2 was THE SHAKESPEARE QUARTET, which was such a horrible piece of software
that I sent it back.  They promised video clips and there were none.  The notes
were only moderately useful, and terribly difficult to access.  The software
was difficult to use, and didn't do most of what it said it would do.
 
THE VOYAGER MACBETH, however, is worth the time and money.  I've been slowly
compiling a list of MINOR bugs for Prof. Braunmuller, but none have been
particularly bothersome or frustrating.  The video clips are well chosen, the
text is responsible, the notes and essays marvelous. This is a useful device
for people teaching Macbeth, although I wonder if it might be somewhat
distracting for a student's first encounter with the play.  The best audience
for the ROM is for non-professional Shakespeareans who are interested in
researching the play.  Any kind of student, high school, undergrad or grad,
writing on the play would find it invaluable.
 
If I think of more specifics, I'll write again.
 
Best,
Brad Berens
Dept. English, UC Berkeley
email: 
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(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steve Urkowitz <SURCC@CUNYVM>
Date:           Sunday, 18 Dec 94 20:45:24 EST
Subject: 5.1006  Role of Fate in *Rom.*
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.1006  Role of Fate in *Rom.*
 
Fate and Rome and Juliet . . .
 
That's a tough and sad issue to contemplate.  I've been reading newspapers,
perhaps too much, and seeing the fatal disasters of places where communities
encourage or demand blood-sacrifices in codes of honor and revenge.  Happens in
schoolyards, in religious and ethnic violence, in the patterned humiliations of
patriarchies and classrooms.  If it were "fate" that decreed such pain, I'd
likely open my veins and ease my way into silence.  But instead I think it
grows ominously out of the social/psychological torments inflicted on children
and replicated autocratically day by day.  Poppa Capulet tries to enforce peace
on Tybalt, but his humiliation/brute force methods only put off Tybalt's
explosions a while.  Oedipus and his macho bravery was spring-loaded, wound up
by the angers of Greek honor-codes.  He was ready to chop SOMEONE, anyone, and
that anyone would be "in-the-place-of" poppa.  Tybalt too.
 
If story-telling works at all, then it may work to warn some of us against
spring-loading our own children with rage.  Maybe that's also what winds up the
rubberbands of the angry Oxfordians?  Injustice in our contentious world
prompts outrage.  Some folks, happier we, consider instead the possibilities of
instead DANCING.
 
g'night gracie,
 
               Steve Urkowitz, 
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