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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: December ::
Authorship: The Move
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 1025.  Tuesday, 27 December 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Hardy M. Cook <
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        Date:   Tuesday, December 27, 1994
        Subj:   Authorship: The Move
 
(2)     From:   Richard J Kennedy <
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        Date:   Sat, 17 Dec 1994 23:18:19 -0800
        Subj:   authorship
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hardy M. Cook <
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Date:           Tuesday, December 27, 1994
Subject:        Authorship: The Move
 
The mail I have received has overwhelmingly supported me in my desire to
relocate the authorship discussion to another place.  I suggested that it move
to the Oxford list, but one of that list's editors, Marty Hyatt, informed me
that he had no desire to host the authorship debate on the Oxford list.  Marty
Hyatt mentioned, however, that the discussion would be appropriate for the
usenet newsgroup rec.arts.theatre.plays.  This seems a reasonable suggestion to
me, and I would encourage anyone interested in continuing the discussion to do
so there.
 
Below is a final posting on authorship submitted on December 17.
 
Again, if anyone has further comments, please address them to me privately.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard J Kennedy <
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Date:           Sat, 17 Dec 1994 23:18:19 -0800
Subject:        authorship
 
When the man from Stratford died in 1616, all the poets and playwrights of the
day held a great silence over the passing, as has been noted. But his death did
not go entirely unnoticed in Stratford. His son-in-law, John Hall, a well-known
physician who lived down the street, kept a diary.  He had a taste for poetry,
and admired Drayton. But when the "soul of the age" passed away, he enters but
one line in his diary to memoralize the day:
 
        "My father-in-law died on Thursday."
 
Then oblivion falls on the man.  Several years pass before anyone else notices
that the man from Stratford has died.  "My father-in-law died on Thursday." You
might give a better report if your cat died, even if it couldn't write sonnets.
 
Kennedy
 

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