1994

Re: *Per.*; *AYL*; *Cardenio*; Friendship; World View

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0993.  Thursday, 8 December 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Matthew Henerson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 7 Dec 1994 12:38:52 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0975  Re: *Pericles*
 
(2)     From:   Lonnie J Durham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 7 Dec 1994 20:50:34 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   AYL and Macbeth
 
(3)     From:   Don Foster <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 08 Dec 1994 09:01:27 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0980  Cardenio
 
(4)     From:   Don Foster <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 08 Dec 1994 09:14:56 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0980  Female Frienships
 
(5)     From:   Grant Moss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 8 Dec 1994 10:37:25 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0980 World View
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Matthew Henerson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 7 Dec 1994 12:38:52 -0500
Subject: 5.0975  Re: *Pericles*
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0975  Re: *Pericles*
 
To Cary M. Mazer:
 
Thank you for the information about Robeson.  Now that you remind me, I
recall that the *Pericles* was indeed '58, and the *Othello* was '59, by
which time I guess that something had happened to allow him to go to
England. I think I recall hearing that he was pretty sick by that time.  I
wonder if that had anything to do with the government giving him his
passport back.  None of the post-war administrations had been noted for
clemency in their dealings with him.
 
Sincerely,
Matt.
 
To Adrian Kiernander:
 
Thank you for the information about Bell and the Bell Shakespeare Company.
I wish I had seen that *Much Ado*.  Do you know if they ever tour outside
of Australia?  By the way, have you heard of Zefferelli's *Much Ado* with
the National Theater in '67 or '68?  That cast (which included Albert
Finney, Robert Stephens, Maggie Smith, Ian McKellen, Derek Jacobi, Frank
Finlay and Lynn Redgrave) also used broad Italian accents which excited
much critical grumbling.  I've heard a recording of it myself, and I go
back and forth on the accents.  For me, they work least well with Dogberry
and Verges, mostly because I can't hear any kind of class distinction, and
so I have trouble understanding why their mangling the English should be
any funnier than, for example, Don Pedro's.  Let me know what you think if
you ever have the chance or inclination to listen to it.
 
Sincerely,
Matt.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lonnie J Durham <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 7 Dec 1994 20:50:34 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        AYL and Macbeth
 
My goodness! What a pleasure it is to run one's mind over such beautifully
imagined productions as those offered by Ron Moyer in this last run of
postings.  I never much liked anything of Garland Wright's until I read
Ron's take on the Guthrie's AYL.  More! More!
 
Gratefully Yours,
Lonnie Durham
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Don Foster <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 08 Dec 1994 09:01:27 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 5.0980  Cardenio
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0980  Cardenio
 
To Timothy Reed about _Cardenio_ (hereafter "Card") and _The Second Maiden's
Tragedy_ ("2MT"):
 
Charles Hamilton is notorious for speaking with great enthusiasm and certainty
even when he hasn't a clue what he's talking about. Every time Hamilton comes
across a document in the Elizabethan "secretary hand," he announces it to be
Shakespeare's.  For example, he told the press that he knew "in five seconds"
that the _Ironside_ MS was in Shakespeare's hand, but in fact the _Ironside_
ms. is in the same hand as that of a playhouse scribe who elsewhere signs
himself "W.P." (as even Eric Sams has since been forced to acknowledge).
 
Card. cannot be identified with 2MT.  The Card. narrative was taken from
Shelton's _Don Quixote_ pt. 3, chapters 9-13, and pt. 4, chaps. 1-5 and 9. 2MT
is taken from pt. 4, chaps. 6-8. The two plays were probably introduced in the
same season, coinciding with the publication of Shelton's translation. (The
evidence of SHAXICON, together with documentary records concerning such plays
as 1-2H4, 2-3H6, "As You Like It" and "What You Will," etc., suggest that it
was fairly standard practice for plays to be paired in production.)
 
In evaluating Hamilton's eccentric claims, you might begin with Harold Metz,
_Sources of Four Plays Ascribed to Shakespeare_; Lewis Theobald's _Double
Falsehood_; Shelton's _Don Quixote_; and Anne Lancashire's edition of 2MT.  The
original Card. was written by Shakespeare and Fletcher, 2MT by Middleton.  That
Shakespeare may have had a revising hand in 2MT is the thesis of Eric Rasmussen
in SQ, in a recent essay that was effectively countered in the SQ Forum by
MacD. Jackson.  Shakespeare may have tinkered some with the MS of 2MT, but the
play is otherwise entirely by Middleton. This is not to say that 2MT is notably
"un-Shakespearean."  Shakespeare in his last works is demonstrably influenced
by Middleton's style, as well as by various incidentals favored by Middleton.
The similarities between Middleton and late Shakespeare have complicated the
problem of such texts as _Timon of Athens_ and the Hecate material in
_Macbeth_.  Foster.
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Don Foster <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 08 Dec 1994 09:14:56 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 5.0980  Female Frienships
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0980  Female Frienships
 
To Helen Ostovich, RE: female friendship between a lady and her maid in the
Carolinian period.
 
One important instance is that of Elizabeth Tanfield Cary and her faithful
servant, Bessie Poulter, as described by Cary's daughter in the "Life of Lady
Falkand" (recently published with Cary's _Mariam_ in a scholarly edition by
Barry Weller and Margie Ferguson).  Don Foster
 
(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Grant Moss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 8 Dec 1994 10:37:25 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0980 World View
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0980 World View
 
Re Paul Silverman's query about Elizabethan views and the theater, a good start
would be Orgel's "The Illusion of Power," which provides a nice discussion of
the Elizabethan and Jacobean court view of theater and masque.
 
Grant Moss
UNC-Chapel Hill

Re: *Hamlet*: Stage History and Dumb Show

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0992.  Thursday, 8 December 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 7 Dec 1994 18:10:18 +0001 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0987 Re: *Hamlet*: Dumb Show and Stage History
 
(2)     From:   David Joseph Kathman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 7 Dec 94 18:04:27 CST
        Subj:   Hamlet stage history
 
(3)     From:   David Levine <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 7 Dec 1994 22:03:03 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0977 Re; *Hamlet*: ...
 
(4)     From:   Bernice W. Kliman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 07 Dec 1994 21:56:08 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   dumb show
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 7 Dec 1994 18:10:18 +0001 (EST)
Subject: 5.0987 Re: *Hamlet*: Dumb Show and Stage History
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0987 Re: *Hamlet*: Dumb Show and Stage History
 
Re Hamlet performances as commonly known by 1604:  Yes, Don Foster is quite
correct, and his list can be made longer.  There is an extended parody of
HAMLET in John Day's LAW TRICKS as well.
 
Helen Ostovich
McMaster University
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Joseph Kathman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 7 Dec 94 18:04:27 CST
Subject:        Hamlet stage history
 
Just a couple of brief notes on the *Hamlet* discussion:
 
1) I don't think Nashe in 1589 is necessarily referring to a printed version
of *Hamlet* at all; in fact I think the reference to "tragical speeches"
makes it more likely that he's talking about a performance of some sort.
Nashe's meaning is usually rather slippery, but I do think the case for
Kyd as the target of this whole passage is pretty strong as these things
go.  Nashe writes of "trivial translators" who make use of Seneca; Kyd's
*Cornelia* was a translation from French of an imitation of Seneca by
Garnier.  Nashe writes of those who "leave the trade of Noverint [i.e.
scrivener] whereto they were born" (Kyd's father was a scrivener) and likens
his target to "the Kidde in Aesop", a likely pun on Kyd's name.  If the
whole passage is about Kyd, I think Nashe is probably implying that Kyd
wrote the *Hamlet* in question.  But I wouldn't bet my life on it.
 
2) I believe Harold Jenkins in the Arden *Hamlet* attributes the Harvey
quote to sometime between 1598 (or more likely mid-1599) and early 1601,
not simply to 1598 as both John Mucci and Dom Saliani have stated.  And
I don't think it's really "obvious" that Harvey is referring to a written
text rather than a written performance, but that's a subjective matter.
I won't try to argue about it.
 
3) Yes, there are parallels between King James and Hamlet; there are also
quite a few, of at least as convincing a nature, between the Earl of Essex
and Hamlet. And I don't want to get into the whole Polonius/Burleigh issue
again.  I just don't think we can take alleged parallels of this nature,
400 years later, and use them as "proof" that some play could not have
been performed publicly, or before the king, or whatever.  Don Foster has
ably summarized the evidence that *Hamlet* was performed between 1600 and
1619; the lack of explicit records of actual performances doesn't mean
much, since most such records have been lost (most of the King's Men's
records perished in a fire around 1619 or so).
 
Yes, there are plenty of problems surrounding *Hamlet*, just as there are
similar problems surrounding many other Elizabethan plays, by Shakespeare
and others.  That's just the way it is, and we do the best we can with
the evidence we have.
 
Dave Kathman
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Levine <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 7 Dec 1994 22:03:03 -0500
Subject: 5.0977 Re; *Hamlet*: ...
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0977 Re; *Hamlet*: ...
 
I hate to sound like a broken record, but Brian Vickers, in Appropriating
Shakespeare, does a wonderful number on Cavell's Shakespeare essays.  After
this, it's hard to take Cavell remotely seriously......
and he shouldn't be......
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bernice W. Kliman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 07 Dec 1994 21:56:08 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        dumb show
 
Many of us recall the dumb show of Richardson's *Hamlet* with Nicol Williamson:
It was done in a kind of speedy Punch-and-Judy style that confused Claudius
and certainly confused me until I had seen it many times at slow speed.  The
whole murder was acted out and the betrayal by Gertrude that Richardson chose
but it was not easy to decipher.  Many productions of course decide to use
one or the other, and maybe that's what Shkespeare's compnay did also,
depending on the audience.  Just a guess.
 
Bernice W. Kliman

Re: Pronounciation; Plays on CD; Multimedia

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0990.  Thursday, 8 December 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Michael Best <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 07 Dec 94 11:32:35 PST
        Subj:   Elizabethan Pronunciation
 
(2)     From:   Harry Hill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 07 Dec 1994 17:17:00 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0984  Qs: Pronounciation
 
(3)     From:   Matthew Henerson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 7 Dec 1994 12:52:49 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0984  Qs: Pronounciation
 
(4)     From:   Michael E. Cohen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 7 Dec 1994 16:27:57 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0984  Plays on CD
 
(5)     From:   David Levine <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 7 Dec 1994 22:32:08 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0984
 
(6)     From:   David Levine <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 7 Dec 1994 19:28:35 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0899 Interactive *H...
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Best <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 07 Dec 94 11:32:35 PST
Subject:        Elizabethan Pronunciation
 
Perhaps not wholly what Tom Hodges wants -- but there are some passages from
Shakespeare read in what we believe is a reconstruction of Shakespeare's
dialect in the latest (CD ROM) version of my program *Shakespeare's Life and
Times*, due out at the end of this month. My colleague Antony Jenkins
(Medievalist and actor) worked from Kokeritz and others to arrive at the final
sounds, then added fine performances to them.
 
You can call Intellimation, who publishes the CD, at 1-800-3-INTELL. I shall
make a fuller announcement (commercial?) when it is released.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Hill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 07 Dec 1994 17:17:00 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0984  Qs: Pronounciation
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0984  Qs: Pronounciation
 
Helge Lokeritz's Danish accent gets in the way; I thought for years after first
hearing his useful record that the Lizzies spoke like the Swedish Chef.
 
        Harry Hill
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Matthew Henerson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 7 Dec 1994 12:52:49 -0500
Subject: 5.0984  Qs: Pronounciation
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0984  Qs: Pronounciation
 
To Tom E. Hodges:
 
I don't know of any audio tapes which replicate Renaissance pronunciation, but
if you can put your hands on John Barton's *Playing Shakespeare* video tapes,
Barton himself reads a passage from *Julius Caesar* (I think) which provides
both a feel for how the language might have sounded and enough text from which
to develop a dialect sheet (hard R's, vowel and diphthong shifts etc.)
 
Sincerely,
Matt.
 
To Carrey Cummings:
 
In addition to Brannagh's Renaissance Theater recordings (*Hamlet*, *Romeo and
Juliet*, and *King Lear*) which you should be able to find on CD at Borders or
Barnes and Noble or, I think sombody wrote and mentioned Waldens, there are at
least two discs of excerpts.  The first is called *Great Shakespearians* and
contains recordings from early part of the century (Frank Benson, Lewis Waller,
and a lot of Gielgud).  The second is a collection of readings by Irene Worth,
but I don't know its title.  Also, you should check stores which specialize in
classical music.  I know of at least two recordings of Mendlesohn's (sp?)
*Midsummer Night's Dream* which include readings of the play.  The newer one
features Peter Hall's company.
 
Good luck,
Matt.
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael E. Cohen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 7 Dec 1994 16:27:57 -0800
Subject: 5.0984  Plays on CD
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0984  Plays on CD
 
Regarding Carey Cummings comment that "I think CD versions would save quite a
bit of room since it is probable that an entire play would fit on a single CD":
the CD-audio standard limits the amount of audio on a single CD to about 78
minutes. I don't think that many of Shakespeare's plays would come in at under
2 hours, so we we're talking about a two-CD set per play.
 
On the other hand, CD-ROM can reduce the frequency range, sampling depth, and
so on to provide pretty good quality for spoken word and still store about 8
hours of sound per disk. But then you would need a computer to play it, and not
an audio CD player...
 
That said, there are good reasons to put the plays on audio CD, regardless of
space: the ability to go very quickly to almost any point in the play (the same
advantage holds true for CD-ROM and laser disc).
 
Michael E. Cohen
a.k.a. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
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From:           David Levine <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 7 Dec 1994 22:32:08 -0500
Subject: 5.0984
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0984
 
I was told last year that Caedmon was re-mastering and releasing its
Shakespeare plays on CD, but it hasn't happened yet, due to low demand, I
guess.  Caedmon is now distributed by HarperCollins.  I may have seen one or
two...but they can't come close to squeezing a play (two to three hours) onto
a single CD.  I don't know about Argo, but I know that both series are
available essentially complete in the UK...Blackwell's or (my favorite) James
Thin in Edinburgh.  The prices are pretty good.  And cassettes don't take up
that much room...
 
I've always found it great fun to have two, three or even more versions of
certain plays (not unlike favorite operas...).  Unfortunately, you can't play
the videotapes sold in the UK (at excellent prices) on our equipment.
 
(6)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Levine <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 7 Dec 1994 19:28:35 -0500
Subject: 5.0899 Interactive *H...
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0899 Interactive *H...
 
I remember a program I read about a few years back that enables students to
experiment with different blockings of scenes.  It seems to me that this sort
of program, included as part of ANY multimedia version of a Shakespeare play,
could be invaluable.
 
Also, why not use the Tony Richardson version with Nicol Williamson, which is
arguably a lot more interesting than the Zeffirelli...
 
There was also a MAGNIFICENT television production done in the '60's, filmed
at Elsinore, with Christopher Plummer.  If anyone can find a copy of this, it
would be well worth preserving.....

Re: *Macbeth*

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0991.  Thursday, 8 December 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Matthew Henerson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 7 Dec 1994 12:09:40 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0982  *Macbeth* Qs
 
(2)     From:   Christine Mack Gordon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 7 Dec 94 14:23:07 -0500
        Subj:   Macbeth CD-ROM
 
(3)     From:   Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 7 Dec 1994 17:27:38 +0001 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0982 *Macbeth* Qs
 
(4)     From:   Kimberley K. Lynn Bridgman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 7 Dec 1994 14:54:37 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0982 *Macbeth* Qs
 
(5)     From:   Richard C. Jones III <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 07 Dec 1994 18:22:01 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0985 Cross-gender casting
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Matthew Henerson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 7 Dec 1994 12:09:40 -0500
Subject: 5.0982  *Macbeth* Qs
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0982  *Macbeth* Qs
 
Dear Daniel J. Colvin:
 
Is your director considering cross-gender casting because he needs parts
for women in a male-heavy play, or does he feel that *Macbeth* has
something to say about gender roles which cross-gender casting might help
emphasize?  If he to needs to use more women (why choose *Macbeth*?), the
simple answer is to let women play the characters as men.  His character
actresses will thank him heartily for it.  Its hard enough for women to
find work in classical rep.  Its particularly hard for women who conform
less than perfectly to some unimaginative casting dirctor's notion of what
constitutes a marketable Juliet.
 
If, on the other hand, he feels that cross gender-casting advances his view
of the play, it sounds like he needs to be clearer with you as to what that
view is.  I agree with you that the play as written is gender-dependent,
but gender-bending could tweak it in all kinds of interesting ways.  If
Duncan is a woman, is she--like Elizabeth--the child of a sonless father
negotiating an essentially patriarchal power structure by manipulating
popular perceptions of feminity, or is Scotland actually a matriarchy, and
is Macbeth's userpation a sexual as well as a political coup?  If Banquo is
a woman, does her status as somehow less glorious than Macbeth ("Noble
Banquo who has no less deserved, and must be known no less to have done
so." or something like that) make her jealous of her partner's success and
quicker to suspect his treason?  Does Lady M regard Banquo as a sexual
rival (I've seen it implied with a male Banquo), and how does that affect
her reaction to her exclusion from Macbeth's plan to murder Banquo?  How
does a sexual tension figure in Macbeth's need to get rid of his fighting
partner.  Perhaps Banquo is the better warrior, and Macbeth gets all the
credit because he is male.  There are all sorts of possibilities, and
schools are wonderful places to play with them.  Just as long as the
director understands the implications of his casting decisions.
 
Please do write, by the way, and tell us/me what you decide to do.
 
Sincerely,
Matt
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Mack Gordon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 7 Dec 94 14:23:07 -0500
Subject:        Macbeth CD-ROM
 
The lastest issue of *American Theater* magazine has a "holiday sampler" in
which they mention a *Macbeth* CD-ROM that is a "personal library on the play,"
which includes the entire text, analysis, reference tools, a full audio
performance by the RSC with clips from other performances, and a karaoke that
allows a reader to perform scenes from the play with professional actors. This
must be the A.C. Braunmuller CD-ROM that Matthew Henerson mentioned in his post
Monday, but does anyone know how to order it? Thanks for your help.
 
Chris Gordon
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 7 Dec 1994 17:27:38 +0001 (EST)
Subject: 5.0982 *Macbeth* Qs
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0982 *Macbeth* Qs
 
Robert LePage directed a MACBETH at the University of Toronto a couple of
years ago, using cross-gendered casting, including Macbeth and Lady
Macbeth.  The production was not particularly successful for many
reasons, but the cross-gendered casting was not one of them.  The
aggressive female Macbeth and Macduff etc created a weird world of magic
gone awry, and the male Lady Macbeth and Lady Macduff emphasized almost
involuntarily the subservience and helplessness of the gender they
represented.  In other words, the cross-gender casting made it quite
clear that Macbeth was responsible for his choices, and that his wife may
have enticed him, but only in the way he was already going.  Lady
Macbeth's subsequent madness seemed to be a predictable result of her
lack of control over her husband and herself, once the regicide had been
committed.  I found the cross-gender casting unnerving and consequently
enlightening for this play in particular.
 
Helen Ostovich
McMaster University
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kimberley K. Lynn Bridgman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 7 Dec 1994 14:54:37 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 5.0982 *Macbeth* Qs
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0982 *Macbeth* Qs
 
Dan--regarding your question about which characters to cast cross-gender
in _Macbeth_--why not cross-gender all of the roles to see what happens?
I think it would be fascinating to see and hear Lady Macbeth's "unsex me"
speech from a man.  The challenge of making that speech work, and other
particularly gender-based ones, would literally re-create the play for
both the actors and your modern audience.... Anyway, it's something to
think about, particularly since you are thinking along the lines of
cross-gender casting anyway.
 
(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard C. Jones III <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 07 Dec 1994 18:22:01 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 5.0985 Cross-gender casting
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0985 Cross-gender casting
 
An easy rule about whether to gender-bend:
 
If you have to ask, no.
 
Rick Jones
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Re: Shakespeare's Voices

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0989.  Thursday, 8 December 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Stephen Schultz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 07 Dec 94 13:33:00 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0988  Re: Shakespeare's Voices
 
(2)     From:   Cary Mazer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 7 Dec 1994 16:46:29 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0988  Re: Shakespeare's Voices
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephen Schultz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 07 Dec 94 13:33:00 EST
Subject: 5.0988  Re: Shakespeare's Voices
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0988  Re: Shakespeare's Voices
 
A couple of additions to Matthew Henerson's informative listing of
Shakespearean sound recordings:
 
1)  He mentions knowing of no recordings by more than one performer before
1940.  E.H. Sothern and Julia Marlowe recorded the Balcony Scene (and, I think,
some other "duets"), and Sothern died in 1933.
 
2) To the plays he mentions which were recorded full-length on 78s, add *Julius
Caesar* by Orson Welles and the Mercury Theatre.  Or at least give credit for a
nod in the "full-length" direction; the whole story gets more or less told, but
the cuts are considerable, especially after the funeral.
 
And while we're on the subject of sound recordings, does anyone know of a
recording by Sir Henry Irving?  I have seen passing and vague mention of one,
but none of the standard sources on Irving suggest that he ever recorded.  I'd
like to know whether the notorious eccentricities were really so odd as GBS and
William Archer (and half of London) thought.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Cary Mazer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 7 Dec 1994 16:46:29 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0988  Re: Shakespeare's Voices
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0988  Re: Shakespeare's Voices
 
I, too, invite SHAKSPER subscribers to listen to Arthur Bourchier's dagger
speech on the Pearl CD, Great Shakespeareans, and you will see why Harry Hill
and I don't always agree about acting.  (And I speak as one who actually LIKES
Edwardian acting).
 
Cary M. Mazer
University of Pennsylvania

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