Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: November ::
Re: Doubling in *Ham*; Anne Lock; Jacobi Hamlet
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0895.  Monday, 7 November 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Geoff Pywell <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Saturday, 05 Nov 1994 10:09:04 -0500
        Subj:   Re: Hamlet and Doubling.
 
(2)     From:   Anthony Martin <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Sunday, 06 Nov 1994 17:13:00 JST
        Subj:   Anne Locke
 
(3)     From:   David Levine <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Sunday, 6 Nov 1994 22:59:00 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0888 Re: Cheek by; ...
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Geoff Pywell <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Saturday, 05 Nov 1994 10:09:04 -0500
Subject:        Re: Hamlet and Doubling.
 
David Kathman's inquiry regarding interesting doubling of roles in Hamlet
reminded me of the production at the Royal Court around 1980.  Richard Eyre
directed Jonathan Pryce in the title role.  As I recollect the play opened with
Claudius rather than the battlements and some judicious cutting (mangling?) of
the text brought us strangely to the Ghost scene wonder-wounded.  At the moment
Hamlet says, 'Speak, I'll go no further.' having followed an imaginary
presence, Pryce fell to his knees as if stricken, writhed and then spoke, 'Mark
me' in a voice that appeared to emanate from his bowels.  Thus the scene was
played out with alternate possession by the 'Ghost' and release that allowed
'Hamlet' to re-emerge and react.  From the distance of years I remember being
very impressed by Pryce's performance; chilling, menacing somehow.  As for the
interpretation thus forced upon us...?
 
Geoff Pywell, Franklin and Marshall College

 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
(717) 291-4016
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Anthony Martin <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Sunday, 06 Nov 1994 17:13:00 JST
Subject:        Anne Locke
 
There are a number of religious sonnets in English, prior to Donne. Sequences
were written in the 1590s by Constable, Barnes, Alabaster and (at great length)
by Anne Locke's son, Henry Lok.
 
Is the attribution of the "Meditations" to Anne Locke, the A.L. who translated
Calvin, certain?
 
 
Anthony Martin
Waseda University
<
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Levine <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Sunday, 6 Nov 1994 22:59:00 -0500
Subject: 5.0888 Re: Cheek by; ...
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0888 Re: Cheek by; ...
 
Re: memories of Jacobi's BBC Hamlet.  I re-viewed the video recently, and was
impressed with the extent to which the viewer was really undecided about his
"madness," and the extent to which he seemed to be confused himself...of
course, this has become the typical contemporary interpretation (Mark Rylance
the best example, I suppose).  But the implications of Jacobi's
interpretation for the actual plot were unusual and interesting:  his play
doesn't really demonstrate Claudius's guilt because Hamlet loses his head
before anything is deomnstrated, especially since Patrick Stewart's Claudius
was the scariest, coolest one I remember.  Other good things in the
production were the sharply delineated Player King and (REALLY unusual) a
real character (and a really nasty one) made of Rosenkrantz.  Interestingly
enough, Jacobi's overall way with the lines caught a lot of flack in the
U.K., where some critics (Clive James, notably) felt he was underlining and
interpreting too much.
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.