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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: November ::
Re: Doubling in *Ham*; Anthology; *Shrew*; *Chimes*
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0901.  Tuesday, 8 November 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Nicholas Clary <
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        Date:   Monday, 07 Nov 1994 08:37:27 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Doubling the Ghost in Hamlet
 
(2)     From:   Marcia Hepps <
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        Date:   Monday, 07 Nov 1994 14:49:44 EST
        Subj:   RE: SHK 5.0896  Re: Renaissance Drama Anthologies
 
(3)     From:   John E. Perry <JPERRY@CEBAFVAX.BITNET>
        Date:   Monday, 07 Nov 1994 12:15:16 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0894 Q: *Shrew* Productions
 
(4)     From:   Charles Edelman <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 08 Nov 94 13:04:00 EST
        Subj:   Chimes at Midnight
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nick Clary <
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Date:           Monday, 07 Nov 1994 08:37:27 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Doubling the Ghost in Hamlet
 
Sir Peter Hall's 1965-66 RSC *Hamlet* doubled the Ghost and Claudius--at least
after it moved from Stratford-upon-Avon to the Aldwych (Brewster Mason played
both roles after Patrick Magee, who played the Ghost when the play opened in
the summer of '65 at Stratford-upon-Avon, left the production).  This doubling
created a stir among those interested in the Oedipal interpretation.
 
Hall's newest *Hamlet*, which is the dedication production for the
re-christening of the Globe Theatre as the Gielgud Theatre, retains this
doubling (at least it had by the time in opened for the preview in July at the
Thorndike Theatre in Leatherhead).  Michael Pennington (who had played Hamlet
years ago for the RSC) plays both the Ghost and Claudius.
 
By the way, for those who had asked about naked Shakespeare and particularly
naked Hamlets, Stephen Dillane offers his up in a production that Hall muses on
his the program notes: "One of the things that Hamlet is certainly about is
finding one's sexuality."
 
Nick Clary

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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marcia Hepps <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 07 Nov 1994 14:49:44 EST
Subject: 5.0896  Re: Renaissance Drama Anthologies
Comment:        RE: SHK 5.0896  Re: Renaissance Drama Anthologies
 
I have used 5 plays of the English Ren. edited by Bernard Beckerman. I am
admitedly biased as I studied with him but I very much like the choice of plays
and his scholarship. Happy trails.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John E. Perry <JPERRY@CEBAFVAX.BITNET>
Date:           Monday, 07 Nov 1994 12:15:16 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 5.0894 Q: *Shrew* Productions
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0894 Q: *Shrew* Productions
 
Thanks to Jim Helsinger for letting me know that I'm not alone on the list in
thinking of *Shrew* as a love story. It surprised me to see no one at all among
the scholars on this list making any attempt to take the play seriously during
the recent discussions on the play.
 
I had never read *Shrew* when I saw Zeffirelli's film in the late 60's (early
70's?). When I later read it for a Shakespeare class, I was disappointed in my
recollection of Burton's portrayal of Petruchio as a dissipated buffoon.
 
As another member of the list has pointed out, artists have the freedom to
interpret the author any way they see fit, but if they do it unwisely, what do
they do to the work?
 
Playing Othello as anything but a loving, gentle husband ruined by too much
faith in a malevolent associate, and too little in himself and his wife, turns
a beautiful tragedy into a tiresome melodrama. In the same way, playing Kate as
anything but a beautiful, twisted monster salvaged by a loving, but strong
gentleman turns a beautiful love story into a stupid, tiresome farce.
 
Really, now, has no one but me noticed that only three acts of unambiguous
violence occur in the play -- and that all three are committed by Kate? Sticks
and whips, indeed!
 
        john perry
        
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(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Charles Edelman <
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Date:           Tuesday, 08 Nov 94 13:04:00 EST
Subject:        Chimes at Midnight
 
Chimes at Midnight is available from Commedia dell'Arte, PO Box 2128,
Manorhaven, NY, 11050,  800-892 0860.  The sound quality is poor but can be
improved by connecting the video player to a good sound system.
 

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