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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: November ::
Re: Interactive *Ha
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0906. Wednesday, 9 November 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Christine Mack Gordon <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 8 Nov 94 09:33:28 -0500
        Subj:   SHK 5.0899 Interactive *Hamlet*
 
(2)     From:   Arthur Pearson <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 8 Nov 1994 09:54:21 -0600
        Subj:   12 Steps to a Safe Hamlet
 
(3)     From:   Maryellen Gruszka <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 8 Nov 1994 10:42:35 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0899  Interactive *Hamlet*
 
(4)     From:   Stuart Rice <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 08 Nov 1994 13:39:13 EST
        Subj:   Interactive *Hamlet*
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Mack Gordon <
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Date:           Tuesday, 8 Nov 94 09:33:28 -0500
Subject: Interactive *Hamlet*
Comment:        SHK 5.0899 Interactive *Hamlet*
 
Hi Stuart,
 
I have some access to your target audience, since my daughter is in high school
and very active in their theater program (currently running lights on a
production of *MND*). The school regularly offers a course on Shakespeare and
I'm sure they'd be interested in trying out your program. I'd also be happy to
share it with colleagues and students here at the University of Minnesota.
 
It might be interesting to include SOME critical materials, both literary and
theatrical to introduce students to the more elaborate framework that surrounds
Will's work these days. (Speaking of which, I'm in the midst of a very
interesting book, *A Buddhist's Shakespeare* by James Howe, published this year
by Associated University Presses.) Such students might also enjoy some
materials from the larger culture that reflect the ways in which the plays
(*Hamlet* especially) have been "adapted"(*Star Trek 6* gets you "To be or not
to be" in Klingon; Calvin and Hobbes did a parody of the speech, the Cookie
Monster presented a Monsterpiece Theater version--with Mel Gibson--on Sesame
Street, etc.). Have fun.
 
Chris Gordon, University of Minnesota
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Arthur Pearson <
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Date:           Tuesday, 8 Nov 1994 09:54:21 -0600
Subject:        12 Steps to a Safe Hamlet
 
To Stuart Rice,
 
In light of the engaging authorship thread, coupled with the current rage of
policital/social/everything correctness, might I suggest providing equal disk
space to the Earl Oxford?  Or, better yet, deleting any and all references to
the author's name?  We must have the courage to hold the mirror up to our own
natures and confess ourselves positive-proof-of-authorship-challenged.  Ergo,
lest we commit the unpardonable sin of enabling an entire generation of young
minds to become addicted to the notion that they are co-dependent upon a myth,
it falls upon us, the authorship dysfunctional, to stand behind the cowardice
of our conscience and wipe the accumulated scholarship slate as clean as a
sound sheep's heart (assuming such a metaphor is in no way disrepectful to our
four legged, wooly fellow earth inhabitants).
 
And if you don't like my ideas, well...that's...OK.  Because I'm good enough,
I'm smart enough and 'zwounds...people like me.
 
Yours in recovery,
Arthur Pear-son (or how can you prove I really am?)
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Maryellen Gruszka <
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Date:           Tuesday, 8 Nov 1994 10:42:35 -0500
Subject: 5.0899  Interactive *Hamlet*
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0899  Interactive *Hamlet*
 
I am currently enrolled in the a graduate course at Brown University called
"Hypertext and Literary Theory," for which two MAT students and I (also an
MAT/English student) are preparing an interactive *Hamlet* on the
Macintosh-based Storyspace system.  We are very excited about the project that
Stuart Rice described in his contribution on Saturday.  I will teach *Hamlet*
at Providence's Classical High School to two sections of Advanced Placement
seniors in February or March and would love to test out the program (either
Stuart's or ours) there.
 
Like Mr. Rice, our group also stuggles with what information is essential to
such an undertaking.  Here's my advice....The beauty of a hypertext system is
the essential disappearance of the "author."  If you put a few historical and
critical pieces into the program, you have done enough.  Just choose the
articles you find most interesting and then design the program so that students
can add to your "web."  This format markets the program to teachers in a much
more desirable way.  They have a built in lesson plan.  The computer version
can form the foundation for a research project in which students choose scenes,
words, characters, etc with which to work and then do library research on their
topic.  They add their research to the system and perhaps write lexias in which
they comment upon the research.  These additions will remain in the program for
next year's students to read.  As the years go on, the program increases so
that it becomes a whole school project involving current students and the work
of past students in a unique intellectual conversation with each other.
 
Seeing that more literature exists on *Hamlet* than on any other Shakespeare
play, you would never finish the project if you decided to place all the
relevant, valuable information into the program yourself.  I think that
students would find my model far more exciting as they would have a vested
interest in creating it.  My experience has been that students grow quite
animated when asked to use computers as today's high schoolers were born and
bred in the technological age.
 
Maryellen Gruszka
MAT/English candidate
Brown University

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(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stuart Rice <
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Date:           Tuesday, 08 Nov 1994 13:39:13 EST
Subject:        Interactive *Hamlet*
 
Dear Friends,
 
Thank you for your various comments (private and journalized) -- they have all
been extremely encouraging.  Thank you also to those who have expressed
interests in beta-testing -- when the time comes I will have much to thank you
for.
 
I would like to point out that the outcome of this project -- whenever that
final outcome may be -- will be FREE.  This is meant to be a helpful resource,
and I think such things should be accessible to all.
 
The original purpose of this project was to give Shakespeare to students in an
electronic format -- to explore the possibility of supplanting the paperback
Penguin, Signet, Dover Thrift Edition, etc. that many of us treasure with the
ability to have the play appear on PowerBook screen in front of you.  But more
than that, the project would allow students to do many things with the text.
How many times do students fumble to find a phrase in the play -- what act,
what scene was that?  Now, they can type in the phrase or a section of it and
the program will find it for them.  How many times does Hamlet say "Die" in the
play?  The program will count up the references and give it to you.  What did
the Globe theater space look like?  Point and click -- a picture appears.
Above all, the program is meant to be FUN.  How many students are turned off by
the dry pontificating of someone about how great Shakespeare was?  They want
PROOF, and they want to ENJOY it.
 
I am in the midst of preparing a kind of sampler of the program, which would
show people what can be done with multimedia and what will appear in the
program.  I am not sure when that will be done -- soon I hope.  If people are
interested in seeing that, I would be more than happy to send off a copy when
it is done.  Please feel free to reach me through private email or through the
SHAKSPER journal.
 
Yours,
Stu Rice

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KENYON COLLEGE
 

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