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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: November ::
Qs: Sh Grammar; Volscians; Hypermedia; Sh World Bib;
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0917.  Monday, 14 November 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Marty Jukovsky <
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        Date:   Friday, 11 Nov 94 14:50:05
        Subj:   Shakespearean Grammar Wanted
 
(2)     From:   Blair Kelly III <
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        Date:   Sunday, 13 Nov 1994 20:54:28 -0500
        Subj:   Who were the Volsces?
 
(3)     From:   Jeff Nyhoff <
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        Date:   Saturday, 12 Nov 1994 07:41:00 -0800
        Subj:   Shakespearean hypermedia
 
(4)     From:   Jean R. Brink <ATJXB@ASUACAD.BITNET>
        Date:   Saturday, 12 Nov 1994 12:19:05 -0700 (MST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0915  *Shakespeare World Bibliography*
 
(5)     From:   Gavin H Witt <
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        Date:   Saturday, 12 Nov 94 16:39:20 CST
        Subj:   Shakespearean fads
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marty Jukovsky <
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Date:           Friday, 11 Nov 94 14:50:05
Subject:        Shakespearean Grammar Wanted
 
I'm looking for a copy of _A Shakespearean Grammar_ by E. A. Abbott (who also
wrote _Flatland_).  The book was reprinted by Dover in 1966, but has gone out
of print.  Has it been reprinted?  Does anyone have a second-hand copy to
sell?
 
Martin Jukovsky
Editor
the Yankee Group
Boston, Mass.

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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Blair Kelly III <
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Date:           Sunday, 13 Nov 1994 20:54:28 -0500
Subject:        Who were the Volsces?
 
The Washington Shakespeare Reading Group recently read Coriolanus.  During the
reading, one of our members asked: "Did the Volscians actually exist, and if
so, who were they?" Looking at the notes in our editions of the play only
informed us that the Volsces were members of a neighboring state of Rome. (We
assume a neighboring city state.)  If so, where was it located?  What was the
history of this "state"?
 
Can anyone enlighten us?
 
Blair Kelly III
Secretary, Washington Shakespeare Reading Group
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jeff Nyhoff <
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Date:           Saturday, 12 Nov 1994 07:41:00 -0800
Subject:        Shakespearean hypermedia
 
Stuart Rice's recent posts regarding his fascinating Hamlet project prods me to
post again a message similar to one I've posted a time or two before on a
couple of different lists (Many thanks to those of you who have been kind
enough to respond, and my apologies to those who are getting sick of my
plea...):
 
My dissertation (UC Berkeley) is a comparative study of Shakespearean QUIT
scholarship in hypermedia -- in particular, of that which includes video and
audio performances.  I'm trying to proceed inductively, examining the
fascinating particular forays into electronic scholarship, searching for the
quantitatively and/or qualitatively new pedagogical, critical, and
philosophical aspects of scholarship in this new thinking/writing/reading
space, and, hopefully, I'll be able to make some reasonably accurate
extrapolations toward the future.  However, the major task continues to be that
of flushing out a substantial number of the many people who I know are out
there, who are testing the potential of this new medium in regard to their
work.  Please come forward!
 
Again, many thanks to those of you who have already responded, but I know there
are many more who have taken (or are contemplating) even a smallstep into
Shakespearean (or other performance-related) scholarship in hypermedia: I'm
*keenly* interested in hearing from you!  Furthermore, I'm also all ears to any
musing (pro or con) on the subject, even if it's off-the-cuff, and even if y ou
have no real intention of attempting scholarship of this sort in the near
future .
 
Even a short note would be much appreciated, and although I sense that the
topic is of broad interest, I can keep any conversation as confidential as you
need it to be.
 
Thanks in advance,
 
Jeff Nyhoff
Calvin College (Computer Science)
Hope College (Theatre)
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jean R. Brink <ATJXB@ASUACAD.BITNET>
Date:           Saturday, 12 Nov 1994 12:19:05 -0700 (MST)
Subject: 5.0915  *Shakespeare World Bibliography*
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0915  *Shakespeare World Bibliography*
 
For exactly what years are we to send bibliographical references to Professor
Harner.  Jean Brink
 
Jean R. Brink  (602) 965-7777
English Department
Arizona State University
Tempe, AZ 85287-0302
 
(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gavin H Witt <
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Date:           Saturday, 12 Nov 94 16:39:20 CST
Subject:        Shakespearean fads
 
List-folks:
 
For an upcoming project, I'm interested in anyone's thoughts regarding the
phenomenon of certain Shakespeare plays going through cycles of popularity.
That is, does anybody have any strong ideas (not that I don't have some, but
I'd like to get responses from the list) as to why some of the more obscure
plays in particular suddenly get done all at once--six different theaters all
doing _Winter's Tale_.
 
Aside from obvious considerations of general cultural context (some appeal
more at some times) or commercial reality (one regional theater has success
with _Coriolanus_ so everybody decides to give it a try), I'd like your
thoughts on what, if any, mass psychology might be operating on Artistic
Directors and the like.
 
Similarly, does anybody have any really good examples of this phenomenon,
recently or historically?  Or, perhaps, has anybody read recently any good
descriptions of this, or accounts by directors or critics of it.
 
Many thanks--and feel free to e-mail me directly or respond list-wide.  I'd
be thrilled to see any extended discussion of this in an open-ended
framework.
 
Gavin Witt

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